Peter the Great, Emperor of Russia: A Study of Historical Biography, Volume 1

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C. Scribner's sons, 1884 - Russia - 691 pages
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Page 277 - Tsar because he had refused to send his children abroad. Theodore Pushkin was one of the sons, and had uttered vague threats of revenge in case the Tsar should have his father whipped to death for his refusal, for rumours to that effect were being industriously circulated. Torture produced confessions of various kinds, and among them repetitions by Zickler of the old accusations against the Princess Sophia. The prisoners were speedily condemned, and were beheaded on the Red Place, after having their...
Page 307 - After I had seen him often, and had conversed much with him, I could not but adore the depth of the providence of God, that had raised up such a furious man to so absolute an authority over so great a part of the world.
Page 306 - Azuph, and with it to attack the Turkish empire; but he did not seem capable of conducting so great a design, though his conduct in his wars since this has discovered a greater genius in him than appeared at that time. He was desirous to understand our doctrine, but he did not seem disposed to mend matters in Moscovy.
Page 274 - Holland anchored off Greenwich and was welcomed with great respect. Peter the First, Czar of Muscovy, was on board. He took boat with a few attendants and was rowed up the Thames to Norfolk Street, where a house overlooking the river had been prepared for his reception. His journey is an epoch in the history, not only of his own country but of ours, and of the world.
Page 301 - There is a house full of people, and right nasty. The Czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at ten o'clock and six at night, is very seldom at home a whole day, very often in the king's yard or by water, dressed in several dresses. The king is expected there this day ; the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in. The king pays for all he has.
Page 306 - ... he is mechanically turned, and seems designed by nature rather to be a ship-carpenter than a great prince. This was his chief study and exercise while he stayed here ; he wrought much with his own hands, and made all about him work at the models of ships.
Page 386 - Charles to acts of immorality. The people began to murmur. They accused the Duke of wishing to bring the King to his death, in order that, as the next heir, he might inherit the crown. Things got to such a pass that, on one Sunday morning, three clergymen preached on the same text : ' Woe to thee, O land, when thy king is a child.
Page 307 - There was a mixture both of passion and severity in his temper. He is resolute, but understands little of war, and seemed not at all inquisitive that way. After I had seen him often, and had conversed much with him, I could not but adore the depth of the Providence of God that had raised up such a furious...
Page 301 - He dines at ten o'clock, and at six at night ; is very seldom at home a whole day ; very often in the king's yard, or by water, dressed in several dresses. The king is expected there this day: the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in. The king pays for all he has.
Page 112 - ... capable of doing this, and sent for a certain Carsten Brandt, who had been brought from Holland about 1660 by the Czar Alexis, for the purpose of constructing vessels on the Caspian Sea. The old man looked over the boat, calked it, put in the mast, arranged the sail, and then launched it on the river. There, before Peter's eyes, he began to sail up and down the river, turning now to the right and then to the left. Peter's excitement was intense. He called out to him to stop, jumped in, and himself...

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