Phantastes

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, May 18, 1981 - Fiction - 185 pages
18 Reviews
Introduction by C. S. Lewis

In October 1857, George MacDonald wrote what he described as a kind of fairy tale, in the hope that it will pay me better than the more evidently serious work. This was Phantastes -- one of MacDonald s most important works; a work which so overwhelmed C. S. Lewis that a few hours after he began reading it he knew he had crossed a great frontier.

The book is about the narrator s (Anodos) dream-like adventures in fairyland, where he confronts tree-spirits and the shadow, sojourns to the palace of the fairy queen, and searches for the spirit of the earth. The tale is vintage MacDonald, conveying a profound sadness and a poignant longing for death.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Amelia_Smith - LibraryThing

This book begins with a great introduction by C.S. Lewis (is that why Amazon has it grouped under Christian fiction?!?). If it weren't for that intro, I'm not sure I would have gotten through it ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AlCracka - LibraryThing

This is a neat little book. It's a bit episodic, and a little flowery, but it's really vivid; there's some terrific imagery in here. It's the story of some dude who goes to fairy land and wanders ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

CHAPTER I
5
CHAPTER II
9
CHAPTER III
10
CHAPTER IV
23
CHAPTER V
32
CHAPTER VI
40
CHAPTER VII
47
CHAPTER VIII
55
CHAPTER XIV
105
CHAPTER XV
111
CHAPTER XVI
116
CHAPTER XVII
118
CHAPTER XVIII
123
CHAPTER XIX
127
CHAPTER XX
145
CHAPTER XXI
154

CHAPTER IX
58
CHAPTER X
64
CHAPTER XI
71
CHAPTER XII
76
CHAPTER XIII
84
CHAPTER XXII
159
CHAPTER XXIII
166
CHAPTER XXIV
179
Copyright

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Page xi - It did nothing to my intellect nor (at that time) to my conscience. Their turn came far later and with the help of many other books and men. But when the process was complete — by which, of course, I mean 'when it had really begun...
Page 10 - I crossed the rivulet, and accompanied it, keeping the footpath on its right bank, until it led me, as I expected, into the wood. Here I left it, without any good reason, and with a vague feeling that I ought to have followed its course: I took a more southerly direction.

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About the author (1981)

(1824-1905) The great nineteenth-century innovator of modern fantasy, whose works influenced C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams. "I do not write for children," MacDonald once said, "but for the childlike, whether of five, or fifty, or seventy-five.

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