Philippine Folk Tales

Front Cover
A. C. McClurg & Company, 1916 - Folklore - 218 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 99 - You must speak.' Immediately the reeds became people, and in each place was a man and a woman who could talk, but the language of each couple differed from that of the others. "Then Lumawig commanded each man and woman to marry, which they did. By and by there were many children, all speaking the same language as their parents.
Page 200 - ... tale bears a striking resemblance to Grimm's "The Table, the Ass, and the Stick," Fairy Tales. JUAN GATHERS GUAVAS Tagalog day Juan's father sent him to get some ripe guavas, for a number of the neighbors had come in and he wanted to give them something to eat. Juan went to the guava bushes and ate all the fruit he could hold, and then he decided to play a joke on his father's guests instead of giving them a feast of guavas. A wasp's nest hung near by. With some difficulty he succeeded in taking...
Page 168 - Spanish general and his brother were with the Sultan, intending to call upon the Princess. As the brother talked with one of the sisters of the Princess they moved toward the window, and looking down they saw Bantugan's ships entering the harbor. They could not tell whose flags the ships bore. Neither could the Sultan when he was called. Then he sent his brother to bring his father who was a very old man, to see if he could tell. The father was kept in a little dark room by himself that he might...
Page 165 - You must give a great yard with a floor of gold, which must be three feet thick." "All this can be given," answered the boy. And the sister of the princess said, "The gifts must be as many as the blades of grass in our city.
Page 100 - Great Spirit, and the next time he visited them, they had not touched the salt. Then he took it away from them and gave it to the people of a place called Mayinit.1 These did as he directed, and because of this he told them that they should always be owners of the salt, and that the other peoples must buy of them. Then Lumawig went to the people of Bontoc and told them to get clay and make pots. They got the clay, but they did not understand the moulding, and the jars were not well shaped. Because...
Page 197 - ... home he met a friend, and told him of his good fortune. The man made him dead drunk and substituted another goat which had not the ability to shake money from its whiskers, and when the new goat was tried at home poor Juan was beaten and scolded. Back he went to the tree, which he threatened to cut down for lying to him, but the tree said, "No, do not kill me and I will give you a magic net which you may cast even on dry ground or into a tree-top and it will return full of fish,
Page 100 - ... from that of the others. Then Lumawig commanded each man and woman to marry, which they did. By and by there were many children, all speaking the same language as their parents. These, in turn, married, and had many children. In this way there came to be many people on the earth.
Page 159 - So Sulayman departed for Mindanao, and he neither walked nor used a boat, but he went through the air and landed on the mountain where the rattan grew. There he stood on the summit and gazed about on all sides. He looked on 'the land and the villages, but he could see no living thing. And he was very sorrowful and cried out: "Alas, how pitiful and dreadful is this devastation 1" No sooner had Sulayman uttered these words than the whole mountain began to move, and then shook.
Page 100 - Lumawig commanded each man and woman to marry, which they did. By and by there were many children, all speaking the same language as their parents. These, in turn, married and had many children. In this way there came to be many people on the earth. "Now Lumawig saw that there were several things which the people on the earth needed to use, so he set to work to supply them. He created salt, and told the inhabitants of one place to boil it down and sell it to their neighbors. But these people could...
Page 160 - As he looked toward the sky he beheld a great bird descending upon him. Immediately he struck at it, cutting off its wing with his sword, and the bird fell dead at his feet; but the wing fell on Sulayman, and he was crushed. Now at this very time King Indarapatra was sitting at his window, and looking out he saw the little tree wither and dry up. "Alas I" he cried, "my brother is dead

Bibliographic information