Philosophy and the Interpretation of Pop Culture

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William Irwin, Jorge J. E. Gracia
Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Philosophy - 297 pages
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Aristotle analyzed the popular art of his time: the tragedies and epics. Why should philosophers today not do likewise? Perhaps we can learn something from children's stories by subverting the dominant paradigm of adult authority and admitting with Socrates that we don't know all the answers. Perhaps Batman has ethical lessons to teach that generalize beyond the pages of comic books. Is it better to like Mozart than it is to like Madonna? Kurt Cobain gave voice to the attitude of a generation, singing, 'Here we are, now entertain us.' Is entertainment a bad thing, or could it actually have value-and not just instrumental value?
 

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Contents

Philosophy Engages Popular Culture An Introduction
1
PHILOSOPHY AND POPULAR CULTURE
19
Philosophy and the Probable Impossible
21
Philosophy asandof Popular Culture
41
Allusion and Intention in Popular Art
65
On the Ties That Bind Characters the Emotions and Popular Fictions
89
Liking Whats Good Why Should We?
117
Popular Art and Entertainment Value
131
Popular Culture and Spontaneous Order or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Tube
161
From Horror to Hero Film Interpretations of Stokers Dracula
187
Socrates at Story Hour Philosophy as a Subversive Motif in Childrens Literature
215
Of Batcaves and Clock Towers Living Damaged Lives in Gotham City
235
American Pie and the Selfcritique of Rock n Roll
255
Photography Popular Epistemology Flexible Realism and Holistic Pragmatism
275
About the Editors and Contributors
295
Copyright

INTERPRETATION AND POPULAR ART FORMS
159

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About the author (2007)

William Irwin is associate professor of philosophy at King's College, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Jorge J. E. Gracia is Samuel P. Capen Chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Philosophy at SUNY-Buffalo. He is the author of Surviving Race, Ethinicity, and Nationality (2005).

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