Philosophy and Revolution: From Hegel to Sartre, and from Marx to Mao

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Lexington Books, 2003 - Philosophy - 377 pages
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Few thought systems have been as distorted and sometimes misconstrued as those of Marx and Hegel. Philosophy and Revolution, presented here in a new edition, attempts to save Marx from interpretations which restrict the revolutionary significance of the philosophy behind his theory. Developing her breakthrough on Hegel's Absolute Idea, Raya Dunayevskaya, who died in the June of 1987, aims at a total liberation of the human person not only from the ills of a capitalist society, but also from the equally oppressive state capitalism of established communist governments. She assumes within her theory of class struggle issues as diverse as feminism, black liberation, and even the new nationalism of third world countries. Moreover, Dunayevskaya combines within herself an incorruptible objectivity with a passionate political attitude, making this work a vibrant and concrete discussion of the vicissitudes of society, justice, equality, and existence."
 

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Dunayevskaya purported to be for the masses,for the most excluded sections in particular black people and women. And then she turned round and wrote in a manner that totally excluded them, in a manner that said' keep out this book is only for those lucky enough to have had the opportunity of going to college and learning advanced philosophical texts'. Did Dunayevskaya really believe that bus drivers and refuse collectors sat around reading Hegel's 'Phenomenology' and his 'Logic'. Unless you can understand complex Hegelian terminology then the essays in this book are gibberish. They are a slap in the face to any member of the working class who attempts to read them, a rebuke that says 'not for the likes of you' . I wish she were alive so I could tell her what a conceited hypocrite she is and that her writings, essays and books are a sick joke. 

Contents

Absolute Negativity as New Beginning The Ceaseless movement of Idle and of History
3
A The Phenomenology of Mind or Experiences of Consciousness
7
B The Science of Logic or Attitudes to Objectivity
18
A Movement from Practice?
33
A New Continent of Thought marxs History Materialism and Its Inseparability from thre Hegelian Dialectic
47
Birth of Historical Materialism
50
The Grundrisse Then and Now
61
1 Progressive Epochs of Social Formations
64
B From Contradiction to Contradiction to Contradiction
160
C Alienation and Revolution
168
The challenge from the left
176
JeanPaul Sartre Outsider looking in
188
A The ProgressiveRegressive Method?
192
B The Dialectic and the Fetish
197
The African Revolutions and the World Economy
213
the Totality of the World Crisis
221

2 THE Automationand the Worker
68
C The Adventures of the Commodity as Fetish
76
The Shock of Recognition and the Philosophic Ambivalence of Lenin
95
ON THE EVE OF WORLD WAR II DEPRESSION IN THE ECONOMY AND IN THOUGHT
123
Leon Trotsky as Theoretician
128
A The Theory of Permanent Revolution
130
B The Nature of the Russian Economy or Making a Fixed Particular into a New Universal
139
C Leadership Leadership
145
The Thought of Mao Tsetung
151
A Discontinuities and Continuities
152
2 The Crucial Year 1965and The Great proletarian Cultural Revolution 196669
155
B New Human Relations or Tragedies Like Biafra?
236
State Capitalism and the East European Revolts
247
A The Movement from Practice Is Itself a Form of Theory
250
B Theory and Theory
255
C Once Again Praxis and the Quest for Universality
263
New Passions and New Forces The Black Dimension the Anti Vietnam War Youth Rank and file labor Womens liberation
267
NOTES
293
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
343
INDEX
359
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About the author (2003)

Raya Dunayevskaya, who died in June 1987, was the founder of Marxist Humanism in the United States. Philosophy and Revolution is the second work of what the author called her "trilogy of revolution." These works represent the development of her 1953 breakthrough on Hegel's Absolute Idea, when she saw within the Absolute Idea a movement from practice as a well as a movement from theory. She perceived this unity as a vision of a new human society.

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