Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique

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R. A. Duff
Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 1998 - Law - 261 pages
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Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, reflecting deeper political and social conflicts.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Reflections on the Encounter between Critique and the Philosophy of the Criminal Law
9
2 Does Criminal Liability Require an Act?
60
3 Simulacra of Morality? Beyond the IdealActual Antinomiesof Criminal Justice
101
Motives and Criminal Liability
156
5 On the General Part of the Criminal Law
205
Index
257
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