Philosophy of Logic

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1986 - Philosophy - 109 pages
4 Reviews
With his customary incisiveness, W. V. Quine presents logic as the product of two factors, truth and grammar--but argues against the doctrine that the logical truths are true because of grammar or language. Rather, in presenting a general theory of grammar and discussing the boundaries and possible extensions of logic, Quine argues that logic is not a mere matter of words.
 

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An excellent book, the author is a lucid writer and powerful logician, no doubt. Be sure to brush up on your basic symbolic logic at first though as he uses some symbolic expressions for his key arguments (and they are necessary to understand his reasoning).

Review: Philosophy of Logic

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Kind of dull, I didn't get the sense of vibrant engagement with the subject matter that Quine usually provides. Perhaps I've just been reading too much about logic these days. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
3
III
5
IV
8
V
10
VI
13
VII
15
IX
17
XXIX
55
XXX
56
XXXI
58
XXXII
61
XXXIII
63
XXXIV
64
XXXV
66
XXXVI
68

X
19
XI
20
XII
22
XIII
23
XIV
25
XV
26
XVI
28
XVII
30
XVIII
32
XIX
35
XXI
37
XXII
40
XXIII
43
XXIV
44
XXV
47
XXVI
49
XXVII
51
XXVIII
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XXXVII
70
XXXVIII
72
XXXIX
74
XL
76
XLI
80
XLIII
82
XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
87
XLVII
89
XLVIII
91
XLIX
93
L
95
LI
97
LII
100
LIII
103
LIV
105
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About the author (1986)

Willard Van Orman Quine (1908--2000) held the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard University from 1956 to 2000. Considered one the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, he is the author of "Mathematical Logic, The Roots of Reference, The Time of My Life: An Autobiography" (MIT Press), and many other books.

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