Physical Geography

Front Cover
Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor,, 1885 - Geography - 124 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - Guyot set forth some of the significant problems of the field of physical geography, which are as follows: 1. What laws govern the situation, extent, outlines, and relief of the land masses? 2. What is the influence of the relief of the continents upon the formation of their systems of rivers and lakes? 3. What is the cause, the extent, the connection, and the influence of the great oceanic currents? 4. What is the fundamental law of the distribution of heat upon the surface of the globe; what modifications...
Page 71 - During the day the earth receives from the sun more heat than it radiates into space; while during the night it radiates more than it receives. Hence a succession of long days and short nights results in an accumulation of heat, raising the average temperature and producing summer; while long nights and short days result in a temperature below the average, producing winter.
Page 31 - Central Plains, which descend gradually from the crests of the Rocky Mountains and...
Page 91 - America has in the eastern half a greater amount of rain than either of the other northern continents in similar latitudes." . . " The great sub-tropical basin of the Gulf of Mexico sends up into the air its wealth of vapors to replace those lost by the winds in crossing the high mountain chains. Hence the eastern portions — the great basins of the Mississippi and the St. Lawrence and the Appalachian region — which, without this source of moisture, would be doomed to drought and barrenness, are...
Page 65 - ... water which rushes over the beach at a height sometimes of 60 feet, and carries everything before it, finishing the work of devastation wrought by the earthquake. 53. They are vast rivers in the sea, moving on steadily through the water, and often differing from the latter in color and temperature. Some are hundreds of miles broad, thousands of feet deep, and have a course embracing the larger part of the ocean through which they move. 54. The intense cold of the polar regions establishes a current...
Page 121 - The continents are made for human societies, as the body is made for the soul." Guyot writes: "The conclusion is irresistible, that the entire globe is a grand organism, every feature of which is the outgrowth of a definite plan of the all-wise Creator for the education of the human family, and the manifestation of his own glory.
Page 8 - Magnets are substances which have the property of attracting pieces of iron or steel, and the term magnetism is applied to the cause of this attraction. Magnetism exists in a natural state in an ore of iron, which is known in chemistry as magnetic oxide of iron, or magnetite. This magnetic ore was first found by the ancients in Magnesia, a city in Asia Minor; hence, substances possessing this property have been called magnets. It was also discovered...
Page 51 - They form reservoirs, which, receiving the surplus waters in times of freshets, equalize the flow of rivers, and prevent destructive inundations. In their basins the wild mountain torrents find rest, and the muddy waters deposit their sediment, and flow out pure and transparent, with a gentle current.
Page 15 - Nearly all the volcanoes on the Earth's surface are situated along the mountain ranges and belts of islands which skirt the shores of the continents, while the interior is almost destitute of them. Omitting a few extinct craters, the only well authenticated exception to this rule is found in the few volcanoes around the Thian-Shan Mountains, in the heart of the great Asiatic continent, nearly 2,000 miles from the sea.
Page 7 - ... 26. The meridian of 20 west longitude. 27. Rotation is the motion on its axis; revolution, the motion in its orbit. 28. One half of the earth is lighted by the sun at one time and the other half is in darkness ; the circle marking the boundary between these two is the circle of illumination. 29. The Ecliptic is a great circle whose plane coincides with that of the earth's orbit, and therefore intersects the plane of the equator at an angle of 23J. It marks the apparent path of the vertical...

Bibliographic information