Physical optics

Front Cover
The Macmillan Company, 1905 - Physical optics - 546 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 135 - Nicol's prism turned in any way. (5) The spectrum of the reflected light is frequently found to consist almost entirely of a comparatively narrow band. When the angle of incidence...
Page 477 - ... plane running east and west, while there is no scattered ray along the north and south line. If the primary ray is unpolarized, the light scattered north and south is entirely due to that component which vibrates east and west, and is therefore perfectly polarized, the direction of its vibration being also east and west. Similarly any other ray scattered horizontally is perfectly polarized, and the vibration is performed in the horizontal plane. In other directions the polarization becomes less...
Page 79 - It will readily be understood, that with the long path between the lens and the image a very slight change in the optical density of any portion of the medium in front of the lens will be sufficient to raise or depress the image above or below the edge of the diaphragm, and will consequently make itself manifest in the telescope. The importance of using a lens of first-class quality is quite apparent, since variations in the density of the glass of the lens will act in the same way as variations...
Page 47 - FG (the path of the centre of the generating circle), and describing circles of diameter BE around various points on it. A line joining the point of intersection of one of these circles with the epicycloid, and the point of tangency with the mirror, will, when produced, give a reflected ray ; for example, JK produced for circle described around H. This construction once prepared, the series of wave-front pictures can be very quickly made. Three or four sheets of paper are laid under the construction...
Page 81 - ... should be slowly lowered (one end resting on the bottom of the dish) until the rectangular piece detaches itself and floats freely on the surface. The edges of the tank are well greased, and then lowered carefully upon the film, to which they will adhere. The whole must then be lifted from the water in an oblique direction, when the film will be found covering the tank and exhibiting the most beautiful interference colors.
Page 477 - According to our hypothesis, the foreign matter may be supposed to load the ether, so as to increase its inertia without altering its resistance to distortion. If the particles were away, the wave would pass on unbroken and no light would be emitted laterally. Even with the particles retarding the motion of the ether, the same will be true if, to counterbalance the increased inertia, suitable forces are caused to act on the ether at all points where the inertia is altered. These forces have the same...
Page 79 - WHY as the globular mass of air already referred to. They must be illuminated by a flash of exceedingly short duration, which must occur while the wave is in the field of view. Toepler showed that this could be done by starting the soundwave with an electric spark, and illuminating it with the flash of a second spark occurring a moment later, while the wave was still in the field. A diagram of the apparatus used is shown in fig. 2. In front of the lens are two brass balls (a, a), between which the...
Page 78 - On looking into the telescope we see the field of the lens uniformly illuminated by the light that passes under the diaphragm, since every part of the image of the spark receives light from the whole lens. If the diaphragm be lowered, the field will darken; if it be raised, the illumination will be increased. In general it is best to have the diaphragm so adjusted that the, lens is quite feebly illuminated, though this is not true for photographic work. Let us now suppose that there is a globular...
Page 144 - I have already pointed out, a thin film of collodion deposited on a bright surface of silver shows brilliant colours in reflected light. It moreover scatters light of a colour complementary to the colour of the directly reflected light. Tliis I find is due to the fact that the collodion film "frills," the mesh, however, being so small that it can only be detected with the highest powers of the microscope.
Page 204 - In fig. 2 we have a diagram illustrating this condition. This plate when held before the eye showed a ring of wide aperture surrounding a brilliant source of light, with four distinct concentrations, two very bright and two quite faint. The appearance reminded one most forcibly of a solar halo with parhelia or mock suns. A photograph of this curious diffraction pattern was made by directing a camera towards a brilliant point source of light, and placing one of the frilled plates before the lens....

Bibliographic information