Physiological Botany: I. Outlines of the Histology of Phaenogamous Plants; II. Vegetable Physiology

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Ivison, Blakeman, 1885 - Botany - 535 pages
 

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Page 27 - If a tissue composed of young cells be left some time in alcohol, or treated with nitric or muriatic acid, a very thin, finely granular membrane becomes detached from the inside of the walls of the cells, in the form of a closed vesicle, which becomes more or less contracted, and consequently removes all the contents of the cell, which are enclosed in this vesicle, from the wall of the cell. Reasons hereafter to be discussed have led me to call this inner cell the primordial utricle...
Page 163 - ... bundles ; or the increased size of the coming leaf-bud will snap them ; or, if these causes are not in operation, a gust of wind, a heavy shower, or even the simple weight of the lamina, will be enough to disrupt the small connections and send the suicidal member to its grave. Such is the history of the fall of the leaf.
Page iii - Structural and Morphological Botany of Phaenogamous Plants properly comes first. It should thoroughly equip a botanist for the scientific prosecution of Systematic Botanj', and furnish needful preparation to those who proceed to the study of Vegetable Physiology and Anatomy !" But I don't "understand plants as living things.
Page 55 - MOHL, HUGO Von. PRINCIPLES OF THE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE VEGETABLE CELL.
Page iii - This volume, on the Structural and Morphological Botany of Phaenogamous Plants, properly comes first. It should thoroughly equip a botanist for the scientific prosecution of Systematic Botany, and furnish needful preparation to those who proceed to the study of Vegetable Physiology and Anatomy, and to the wide and varied department of Cryptogamic Botany.
Page 25 - Its substance, he says, is wholly filled with air, which " is perfectly enclosed in little Boxes or Cells distinct from one another." Further, he gives an idea of the dimensions of these cells by stating that about sixty could be placed endways in the -l^th part of an inch, and that 1,166,400 could be placed in a square inch.
Page 17 - By agitation, and with the aid of the heat of a spirit-lamp, the carmine is soon dissolved. The ammoniacal solution is to be boiled for a few seconds and then allowed to cool. After the lapse of an hour, much of the excess of ammonia will have escaped. The glycerine and water may then be added and the whole passed through a filter, or allowed to stand for some time, and the perfectly clear supernatant fluid poured off and kept for use. This solution will keep for...
Page 161 - ... transformed into a double layer of thin-walled, elongated cells forming the secreting surface, which is charged, together with the parenchyma lying below it, with a syrup derived from the transformation of starch.
Page 21 - ... they gradually regain their original volume if left in it for some time. In practice, the specimen is first immersed in weak glycerine or syrup, and the density of the fluid is gradually increased. In this way, in the course of two or three days, the softest and most delicate tissues may be made to swell out almost to their original volume in the densest glycerine or syrup.
Page 27 - The remainder of the cell is more or less densely filled with an opaque, viscid fluid of a white color, having granules intermingled in it, which fluid I call protoplasm.

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