Physiology for Beginners

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Macmillan and Company, 1896 - Physiology - 241 pages
 

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Page 197 - But we can form a much better judgment as to the weight of the body if instead of keeping the hand still on the table we raise and lower the hand so as to lift the body up and down. We then form our judgment by sensations which are in some way connected with the contraction of the muscles by which the weight is poised, and hence are called muscular sensations. Taste. — The organ of the sense of taste is the mucous membrane of the mouth, especially that of the tongue and palate. The tongue is composed...
Page 193 - ... the property of the same. On each side of the vertebral column there is a chain of ganglia connected with nerve fibre, called the sympathetic cord (Ida and Pingala), extending all the way from the base of the skull to the coccyx. This is in communication with the spinal cord. It is noteworthy that there is in the thoracic and lumbar regions a ganglion of each chain corresponding with great regularity to each spinal nerve, though in the cervical region many of them appear to be missing; and that...
Page 72 - Diagram to show the action of the biceps muscle of the arm. The two tendons by which the muscle is attached to the scapula are seen at...
Page 169 - Diagram to show the structure of the skin. Ec, epidermis corneous part; Em, epidermis Malpighian part; Dc, connective tissue of dermis: p, papilla...
Page 221 - Stretching across the cavity of the middle ear from the tympanic membrane to the fenestra ovalis is a chain formed by three very delicate bones.
Page 135 - Diagram to illustrate the structure of glands. A , Typical structure of a mucous membrane with two layers of epithelial cells, a, b ', c, the connective tissue beneath, with e, blood-vessels, andy, connective tissue cells.
Page 200 - But holding the nose will not do away with a taste proper like that of sugar or of hops. True tastes may be mixed with other sensations in addition to those of smell, such as pungent, smarting, tingling, or similar sensations. Our judgment of the flavour of what we eat is formed after taking into account all the sensations which it gives rise to. Smell. — The organ of the sense of smell is the mucous membrane lining the upper part of the cavity of the nose. The nostrils or anterior nares lead into...
Page 89 - ... semilunar valves. In A, auricle contracting, ventricle dilated, mitral valve open, semilunar valves closed. In...
Page v - THIS little work is intended for those who, without any previous knowledge of the subject, desire to begin the serious study of Physiology. It is written in a more elementary and didactic manner than the Elementary Lessons of Professor Huxley, and, it is hoped, may serve as an introduction to that volume.

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