Picciola, or, The prison flower & other tales

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W. & R. Chambers, 1885 - Children - 143 pages
 

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Page 126 - The boy looked up in his bright, fearless way (it did my heart good to look at him, the brave little chap!) and says, quietly, 'I've told you the truth; I ain't got no more to say.
Page 123 - Bout three years ago, afore I got this berth as I'm in now, I was second-engineer aboard a Liverpool steamer bound for New York. There'd been a lot of extra cargo sent down just at the last minute, and we'd had no end of a job stowin...
Page 124 - I didn't wait to hear no more, but up on deck like a sky-rocket : and there I did see a sight, and no mistake. Every man-Jack o...
Page 123 - Can no one but an Englishman have any pluck, then ?" asked I, laughing. " Well, I won't just go for to say that; o' course a man as is a man 'ull have pluck in him all the world over. I've seed a Frencher tackle a shark to save his messmate ; and I've seed a Rooshan stand to his gun arter every man in the battery, barrin' himself, had been blowed all to smash.
Page 122 - I was standing on the upper deck of the Austrian Lloyd steamer, looking my last upon pyramidal Jaffa, as it rises up in terrace after terrace of stern gray masonry against the lustrous evening sky, with the foam-tipped breakers at its feet. Beside me, with his elbow on the hand-rail, and his short pipe between his teeth, lounged the stalwart chief-engineer, as thorough an Englishman as though he had not spent twothirds of his life abroad. He delighted to get hold of a listener, who— as he phrased...
Page 124 - Well, we found him stowed away among the casks for'ard ; and ten to one we 'd never ha' twigged him at all if the skipper's dog hadn't sniffed him out and begun barkin'. Sitch a little mite as he is, too ! I could a'most put him in my baccy-pouch, poor little beggar ! but he looks to be a good-plucked un for all that.
Page 126 - ... for a day or two till I got to sea. He says I'm to go to Aunt Jane, at Halifax; and here's her address.' And with that, he slips his hand into the breast of his shirt, and out with a scrap o' paper, awful dirty and crumpled up, but with the address on it right enough. " We all believed every word on't, even without the paper ; for his look, and his voice, and the way he spoke, was enough to show that there warn'ta ha'porth o' lyin
Page 129 - And he kep' his word, .too. When we got to Halifax, he found out the little un's aunt, and gev' her a lump o' money to make him comfortable ; and now he goes to see the youngster every voyage, as reg'lar as can be ; and to see the pair on !em together — the little chap so fond of him, and not bearin' him a bit o' grudge — it's 'bout as pretty a sight as ever I seed.
Page 126 - ... paper, awful dirty and crumpled up, but with the address on it, right enough. "We all believed every word on't, even without the paper; for his look, and his voice, and the way he spoke, was enough to show that there warn'ta ha'porth o' lyin' in his whole skin. But the mate didn't seem to swallow the yarn at all ; he only shrugged his shoulders with a kind o...
Page 126 - Look here, my lad ; that's all very fine, but it won't do here— some o' these men o' mine are in the secret, and I mean to have it out of 'em. Now, you just point out the man as stowed you away and fed you, this very minute ; if you...

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