Picturesque Views of Public Edifices in Paris

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J. Moyes, 1814 - Public buildings - 40 pages
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Page 2 - The whole façade is adorned with Ionic pillars, placed on pedestals. Above these, on the three centre pavilions, and the piles of building which connect them, appears the Corinthian order, over which is the attic story of the palace, surmounted by a balustrade supporting elegant stone vases. The two other ranges of building, with the pavilions which terminate them, are adorned with fluted columns of the Composite order. The pillars are all formed of superb brown and red marble. The entrance to the...
Page 2 - Every order of architecture is rendered subservient to the embellishment of this magnificent edifice; but the Ionic pillars on the right of the terrace particularly captivate the eye by their beautiful proportion and exquisite workmanship. In 1664, Louis XIV. completed the embellishment of this palace. Previous to this the large pavilion in the centre consisted only of the Ionic and Corinthian orders. To these he added the Composite, and crowned the building with an additional story.
Page 2 - The whole faf ade is adorned with Ionic pillars, placed on pedestals. Above these, on the three centre pavilions, and the piles of building which connect them, appears the Corinthian order, over which is the attic story of the palace, surmounted by a balustrade. The balustrade of the pavilions at the extremities is surmounted by elegant stone vases. The two other ranges of building, with the pavilions which terminate them, are adorned with fluted columns of the Composite order. The pillars are all...
Page 27 - Odón de Sully, father of Philip Augustus, and of Henry of England, succeeded Bishop Maurice, and continued the building till 1208, when he died. The tomb of brass on which his image appears in bas-relief, was to be seen in the choir, before the embellishments made by Louis XIV. in 1714. Peter of Nemours continued the work till his death in 1220, and left to the bishops who succeeded him the care of completing the edifice. It is supposed that the grand entrance was not finished until the reign of...
Page 34 - He was not so happy in the construction of the towers, which only degrade the majestic appearance of the building. In 1777, M. Chalgrin rebuilt them. They are two hundred and ten feet high, being six more than those of Notre Dame. The consecration of this church took place in 1745, when the interior was totally finished^ The altar placed between the nave and choir is grand and majestic. It was once covered with a large canopy ; but the manner in which it was suspended by three visible cords presenting...
Page 4 - The gardens of the Tuileries are well laid out. The principal walk, extending the whole length of the garden, and bordered throughout by fine orange-trees in every progressive stage of vegetation, forms a delightful promenade in summer. In the morning these gardens are the resort of the politician. In the evening they are crowded by a gayer assembly. Some fine specimens of ancient sculpture are placed in different parts. The traveller will particularly notice the statues of Meleager, Hippomenes,...
Page 28 - It appears, then, that this immense structure was the unin-» terrupted work of nearly 300 years. The general plan is grand and noble, the proportions pleasing, and the whole building may be justly considered as one of the most beautiful and magnificent monuments of Gothic architecture in Europe. Some have supposed, from its contiguity to the river, that part of it was built upon piles : but in different examinations, but more particularly that which was made in...
Page 3 - Over the centre arch, also, in a triumphal car, was the statue of Napoleon. The bronze horses were the celebrated productions of Lysippus, which formerly ornamented the square of St. Marc at Venice, and which had before adorned the arch of Nero at Rome.
Page 2 - The palace was much enlarged by Henry IV., and afterwards by Louis XIII. The front now consists of five pavilions, comprising that in the centre ; with four ranges of buildings connecting them together, and forming one grand facade.
Page 28 - ... length, one hundred and forty-four in breadth, and one hundred and two in height to the roof. The height of the towers is two hundred and four feet, each of which is forty feet wide. In this church are one hundred and twenty large pillars, and one hundred and eight columns, each of solid marble.

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