Picturing Faith: Photography and the Great Depression

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2004 - Photography - 319 pages
0 Reviews
In the midst of the Great Depression, the American government initiated one of the most ambitious national photographic projects ever undertaken. Such photographers as Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Gordon Parks--all then virtually unknown--were commissioned to chronicle in pictures the economic struggle and social dislocation of the Depression era. They explored every facet of rural life in an effort to document the troubles, as well as the spirit, of the nation. Fanning out across the country, these photographers captured a nation alive with religious faith--from Dust Bowl migrants singing hymns to orthodox Jews praying in rural Connecticut. In ""Picturing Faith, ""the preeminent historian of religion Colleen McDannell recounts the history of this extraordinary project, telling the stories of the men and women who participated in it and exploring these little-known images of America. Lavishly illustrated, ""Picturing Faith ""teases"" ""out the various and conflicting ways that these photographers portrayed American religion and enhances our understanding of how religion was practiced during this critical period of American history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Picturing faith: photography and the Great Depression

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

McDannell presents a persuasive case that religion has been overlooked in our historical understanding of the enduring photographs of the Great Depression. She opens the book by comparing Dorothea ... Read full review

Contents

1 Introducing Americans to America
1
2 Enduring Faith
23
3 Churches Without People
53
4 Another South
79
5 Christian Charity
113
6 New Mexicos Patriots
139
7 Farming Jews
167
8 The Negro Church
197
9 City Congregations
231
10 Projects End
269
Notes
279
Acknowledgments
303
Index
307
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Colleen McDannell is Sterling McMurrin Chair of Religious Studies and associate professor of history at the University of Utah.

Bibliographic information