Picturing Place: Photography and the Geographical Imagination

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I.B.Tauris, Apr 19, 2003 - Art - 354 pages
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The advent of photography opened new worlds to 19th-century viewers, who became able to visualize themselves, their immediate surroundings, their communities, and the world beyond. The geographical imagination—the ability to know the world and situate oneself in space and time—fostered the expectations and applications of photographic technologies, and photographic technologies expresses the form and reach of the geographical imagination. This dialectic is the basis of this collection of intriguing essays, which explore the diverse ways in which the relationship manifested.
 

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Contents

Photography and the Geographical Imagination
1
Constructing the State Managing the Corporation Transforming
14
Ia Mission Heliographique Architectural Photography Collective
21
Intertextuality and Imaginative
55
Photographic Constructions of the Grand Canyon
74
Family Photograph Albums and the Domestication
96
Landscape Photography and National Identity
117
Railway Photography
141
Photographic Practices and Productions
195
Photographic Surveys by the Royal
226
Photographs of British Families in the Lucknow
243
Some Photographic Incidents in the Western
261
Picturing Place in the Post
283
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About the author (2003)

Joan Schwartz is Senior Photography Specialist at the National Archives of Canada.

James Ryan is Lecturer in Human Geography in the School of Geography, Queen's University, Belfast.

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