Piety, Politics, and Pluralism: Religion, the Courts, and the 2000 Election

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Political Science - 257 pages
Piety, Politics, and Pluralism skillfully confronts the question: Is liberal democracy hostile to religion or is it compatible with the rights of believers? Prominent scholars analyze the controversy about religious freedom by examining two areas at the intersection of religion and politics in contemporary American society: the Supreme Court's 1990 decision in Oregon v. Smith and the events of the 2000 presidential campaign. Their essays remind us that in an increasingly pluralistic society, Americans must work continually to reconcile religious commitment and political obligation. Piety, Politics, and Pluralism is a groundbreaking work that will be indispensable to students of religion and politics, American politics, and constitutional law.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Religion and Liberal Democracy An American Perspective
1
The Extraordinary Election of 2000
19
Bush v Gore Judicial Activism Conservative Style
41
The Christian Right in the 2000 GOP Presidential Campaign
57
Catholics and the 2000 Presidential Election Bob Jones University and the Catholic Vote
75
Stealth Politics Religious and Moral Issues in the 2000 Election
105
A Historic First The Lieberman Nomination
127
Evolving Standards under the Free Exercise Clause Neutrality or Accommodation?
151
The Constitutional Context of Religious Liberty in the United States
177
Political Culture Political Structure and Political Conflict The Persistence of ChurchState Conflict in the United States
203
Public Attitudes on Church and State Coexistence or Conflict?
221
Bibliography
235
Index
247
About the Contributors
255
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2002)

Mary C. Segers is professor of political science at Rutgers University.

Bibliographic information