Pike's System of Arithmetick Abridged: Designed to Facilitate the Study of the Science of Numbers, Comprehending the Most Perspicuous and Accurate Rules, Illustrated by Useful Examples : to which are Added Appropriate Questions, for the Examination of Scholars, and a Short System of Book-keeping

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J.B. Moore, 1827 - Arithmetic - 200 pages
 

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Page 31 - Cut off- as many figures from the right hand of the dividend as there are ciphers in the divisor. The remaining figures of the dividend will be the quotient, and those cut off the remainder.
Page 183 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits — Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 73 - Operations with Fractions A) To change a mixed number to an improper fraction, simply multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction and add the numerator.
Page 160 - OF THE CUBE ROOT. A cube is any number multiplied by its square. To extract the cube root, is to find a number, which, being multiplied into its square, shall produce the given number. RULE. 1 . Separate the given number into periods of three figures each, by putting a point over the unit figure, and eyery third figure from the place of units to the left, and if there be decimals, to the right.
Page 167 - ... 7. Bring down the first figure of the next period to the remainder for a new dividend, to which find a new divisor as before, and in like manner proceed till the whole be finished.
Page 154 - DISTINGUISH the given number into periods of two figures each, by putting a point over the place of units, another over the place of hundreds, and so on, which points shew the number of figures the root will consist of. 2. " FIND the greatest square number in the first, or left hand period...
Page 76 - Multiply each numerator into all the denominators except its own, for a new numerator : and all the denominators into each other continually for a common denominator; this written under the several new numerators will give the fractions required.
Page 183 - Goose, and a peck of corn, in his journey, came to a river, where it so happened that he could carry but one over at a time. Now as no two were to be left together that might destroy each other ; so he was at his wit's end how to dispose of them ; for, says he, tho' the corn can't eat the goose, nor the goose eat the fox ; yet the fox can eat the goose, and the goose eat the corn.
Page 160 - Subtract the cube thus found, from the said period, and to the remainder bring down the next period, and call this the dividend.
Page 93 - ... if the shillings be odd ; and the third place by 1 "when the farthings exceed 12, and by 2 when they exceed 36.

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