Place and Politics in Modern Italy

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 2002 - History - 299 pages
How do the places where people live help structure and restructure their sociopolitical identities and interests? In this book, renowned political geographer John A. Agnew presents a theoretical model that addresses the relation of place to politics and applies it to a series of historicogeographical case studies set in modern Italy.

For Agnew, place is not just a static backdrop against which events occur, but a dynamic component of social, economic, and political processes. He shows, for instance, how the lack of a common "landscape ideal" or physical image of Italy delayed the development of a sense of nationhood among Italians after unification. And Agnew uses the post-1992 victory of the Northern League over the Christian Democrats in many parts of northern Italy to explore how parties are replaced geographically during periods of intense political change.

Providing a fresh new approach to studying the role of space and place in social change, Place and Politics in Modern Italy will interest geographers, political scientists, and social theorists.

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About the author (2002)

John A. Agnew is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author or coauthor of a number of books, most recently Geopolitics: Re-visioning World Politics and The Geogrpahy of the World Economy, third edition.