Places that count: traditional cultural properties in cultural resource management

Front Cover
Altamira Press, 2003 - Architecture - 335 pages
0 Reviews
Places That Count offers professionals within the field of cultural resource management (CRM) valuable practical advice on dealing with traditional cultural properties (TCPs). Responsible for coining the term to describe places of community-based cultural importance, Thomas King now revisits this subject to instruct readers in TCP site identification, documentation, and management. With more than 30 years of experience at working with communities on such sites, he identifies common issues of contention and methods of resolving them through consultation and other means. Through the extensive use of examples, from urban ghettos to Polynesian ponds to Mount Shasta, TCPs are shown not to be limited simply to American Indian burial and religious sites, but include a wide array of valued locations and landscapes--the United States and worldwide. This is a must-read for anyone involved in historical preservation, cultural resource management, or community development.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Getting Started with TCPs
1
How Did TCPs Come into Our Vernacular? A Personal Perspective
21
Examples from Far and Wide
45
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Thomas F. King is one of the leading consultants in cultural resources management in the United States. He teaches dozens of workshops each year on this topic for SWCA Environmental Consultants and is author of many major books in the field including, Saving Places that Matter (2007), Cultural Resource Laws and Practice (2004) and Federal Planning and Historic Places (2000). Former staff member of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, he has been in the heritage management business for four decades.