Plan of Parliamentary Reform: In the Form of a Catechism, with Reasons for Each Article, with an Introduction, Shewing the Necessity of Radical, and the Inadequacy of Moderate, Reform

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R. Hunter, successor to Mr. Johnson, 1817 - Electronic book - 68 pages
 

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Page xl - Treasury, and that, under any probable diminution of its future annual products, which the vicissitudes of commerce may occasion, it will afford an ample fund for the effectual and early extinguishment of the public debt. It has been estimated, that during the year 1816, the actual receipts of revenue at the Treasury, including the balance at the commencement of the year, and excluding...
Page xlvi - Balance — balance — politicians upon roses — to whom, to save the toil of thinking on questions most wide in extent, and most high in importance — an allusion — an emblem — an any thing — so as it has been accepted by others, is accepted as conclusive evidence : what mean ye by this your balance ? Know ye not, that in a machine of any kind, when forces balance each other, the machine is at a stand? Well, and in the machine of government, immobility — the perpetual absence of all motion...
Page xl - It has been estimated, that during the year 1816, the actual receipts of revenue at the Treasury, including the balance at the commencement of the year, and excluding the proceeds of loans and Treasury notes, will amount to about...
Page lxxix - England, of the which most part was of people of small substance, and of no value, whereof every of them pretended a voice equivalent, as to such elections to be made, with the most worthy knights and esquires...
Page lxxxix - ... the genuine feeling of every gentleman who hears me, that all the superior classes of the female sex of England must be more capable of exercising the elective suffrage with deliberation and propriety, than the uninformed individuals of the lowest class of men to whom the advocates of universal suffrage would extend it.
Page cxxxiii - I am summoned to meetings, where I sometimes think it my duty to declare them openly before twenty or thirty persons; and the next day I am forced either to vote contrary to them, or to vote with an opposition which I abhor.
Page ccxlvi - As to what is called a revolution-principle, my opinion was this: that whenever those evils which usually attend and follow a violent change of government were not in probability so pernicious as the grievances we suffer under a present power, then the public good will justify such a revolution.
Page ccxlvi - As to parliaments, I adored the wisdom of that Gothic institution which made them annual : and I was confident our liberty could never be placed upon a firm foundation until that ancient law were...

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