Plant Genetic Engineering: Towards the Third Millennium

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Elsevier, Feb 14, 2000 - Business & Economics - 284 pages
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Plant biotechnology offers important opportunities for agriculture, horticulture, and the pharmaceutical and food industry by generating transgenic varieties with altered properties. This is likely to change farming practice and reduce the potential negative impact of plant production on the environment. This volume shows the worldwide advances and potential benefits of plant genetic engineering focusing on the third millennium. The authors discuss the production of transgenic plants resistant to biotic and abiotic stress, the improvement of plant qualities, the use of transgenic plants as bioreactors, and the use of plant genomics for genetic improvement and gene cloning. Unique to this book is the integrative point of view taken between plant genetic engineering and socioeconomic and environmental issues. Considerations of regulatory processes to release genetically modified plants, as well as the public acceptance of the transgenic plants are also discussed. This book will be welcomed by biotechnologists, researchers and students alike working in the biological sciences. It should also prove useful to everyone dedicated to the study of the socioeconomic and environmental impact of the new technologies, while providing recent scientific information on the progress and perspectives of the production of genetically modified plants.


The work is dedicated to Professor Marc van Montagu.

 

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Contents

Challenges and Opportunities
1
Can the Biotechnology Revolution Feed the World?
7
A Perspective from FAO
13
Molecular Markers in Variety and Seed Testing
27
The Genetic Basis of Drought Tolerance in Maize and Options for Improvement Via MarkerAssisted Selection
35
Analysis of Quantitative Trait Locis QTL Based on linkage Maps in Coconut Cocos nucifera L
42
Molecular Characterization of the Sugarcane Variability for Genetic Improvement
49
Practical Implications
62
Inserting the Nucleoprotein Gene of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Different Plant Species and Screening for Virus Resistance
148
Advances in Potato Improvement Through Genetic Engineering
154
Transgenic Plants Towards the Third Millennium
159
Commercialization of Genetically Engineered Potato Plants Resistant to Disease
166
Potato Transgenic Plants Expressing Mammalian Double Stranded RNADependent Protein Kinase mPKR
172
Genetic Engineering of Potato for Tolerance to Biotic and Abiotic Stress
177
Improvement of Oil Quality and Quantity and Alteration of Carbon Flux
182
Towards the Improvement of Sugarcane Bagasse as Raw Material for the Production of Paper Pulp and Animal Feed
189

On the Mechanism of Horizontal Gene Transfer by Agrobacterium tumefaciens
68
Production of Transgenic Plants Expressing Proteins with Agronomic and Industrial Value
76
Progress in Agrobacteriummediated Maize Transformation at the Plant Transformation Facility of Iowa State University
82
Assessment of Conditions Affecting Agrobacteriummediated Soybean Transformation and Routine Recovery of Transgenic Soybean
88
Present and Perspectives
95
Histological and Ultrastructural Analysis of A rhizogenesmediated Root Formation in Walnut Cuttings
100
Genetic Improvement Program at the Institute of Plant Biotechnology
107
Sweet Potato Ipomoea batatas L Regeneration and Transformation Technology to Provide Weevil Cylas formicarius Resistance Field Trial Results
112
Progress Towards Practical Development in Sugarcane and Implications for Other Plant Species
118
Polycistronic Translation in Plants What Can we Learn from Viruses
126
Towards PlantibodyMediated Resistance to Plant Parasitic Nematodes
130
Field and Molecular Evaluation of InsectResistant Transgenic Poplar Populus nigra L Trees
137
Insectresistant Tropical Plants and New Assessment About Cry Proteins
143
Strategies for Fructan Production in Transgenic Sugarcane Saccharum spp L and Sweet Potato Ipomoea batata L Plants Expressing the Acetobacter di...
194
Molecular Analysis of Plant Fructan Accumulation
199
Genetic Engineering of Fruits and Vegetables with the Ethylene Control Gene Encoding Sadenosylmethionine hydrolase SAMase
206
Improvement of Wood Quality for the Pulp and Paper Industry by Genetic Modification of Lignin Biosynthesis in Poplar
215
CIGB experience
222
Toward Molecular Farming of Therapeutics in Plants
229
Production of Autoantigens in Plant for Oral Immunotherapy of Autoimmune Diseases
239
Safety Assessments for Commercialization of Transgenic Crops and Results of Commercialization
249
Does Biotechnology Change the Research and Development Organizations?
256
Biological Aspects and Ethical Considerations for the Utilization of GMOs
262
Index
270
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Page 22 - Article, patents shall be available and patent rights enjoyable without discrimination as to the place of invention, the field of technology and whether products are imported or locally produced.
Page 22 - Subject to the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3, patents shall be available for any inventions, whether products or processes, in all fields of technology, provided that they are new, involve an inventive step and are capable of industrial application.
Page 22 - ... plants and animals other than micro-organisms, and essentially biological processes for the production of plants or animals other than non-biological and microbiological processes. However, Members shall provide for the protection of plant varieties either by patents or by an effective sui generis system or by any combination thereof.
Page 27 - States became a member of the International Union for the Pro-tection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV).

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