Plays, Volume 1

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Little, Brown,, 1920
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Page 585 - She starts violently, with a hysterical drawing in of her breath, an expression of fear and horror, as she knows this is the final moment of parting. Hale also starts slightly, rising, and his muscles grow rigid. He clasps and kisses her once more, but only for a second. They both are unconscious of Tom, of everything but each other. Tom takes her firmly from Hale and leads her out, her eyes fixed upon Hale's eyes, their arms outstretched toward each other. After a few paces she breaks forcibly away...
Page 513 - I am fully sensible of the consequences of discovery and capture in such a situation. But for a year I have been attached to the army and have not rendered any material service, while receiving a compensation for which I make no return. Yet I am not influenced by the expectation of promotion or pecuniary reward.
Page 276 - London bridge is falling down, Falling down, falling down. London bridge is falling down, My fair lady!
Page xxxiii - The Moth and the Flame (1898), The Cowboy and the Lady (with Willis Steel, 1899), Barbara Frietchie (1899), The Climbers (1901), Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines (1901), Lovers...
Page 59 - I'm not such a fool. [BEAU is not at all taken aback by the mistake he has made.] BEAU. Ah, no, I believe I am mistaken; but, my dear Horatia, one gets things of this sort so mixed ; and I plead in extenuation...
Page 15 - I'm sure, [going] but what about Mr. Abrahams, sir? MORTIMER [seating himself]. Oh, damn Abrahams! [Enter ABRAHAMS from ante-room, hat and cane in hand. ABRAHAMS is the typical Jew money-lender of the period, exaggerated in dress and manner.] ABRAHAMS [advancing just as SIMPSON crosses back of table and exits, giving him a look of haughty disdain]. No, you don't, Mr. Mortimer; no, you don't, not yet. Where's your master ? MORTIMER. Excuse me, where's my gentleman, you mean, Mr. Abrahams. [Rising.]...
Page 74 - Whom shall I say, sir? VINCENT. Never mind introducing me. I'll introduce myself — tell him a gentleman wishes to see him in answer to his message ; he'll understand. SIMPSON. Yes, sir. [SIMPSON goes out at Left door with a look of disdain at VINCENT. VINCENT. [Who is in a state of great excitement.] Well, am I really in the great Mr. Brummell's house ? I thought I'd show my appreciation of the honor I feel in Mr. Brummell's suit for my daughter's 'and by answering his message in person. But, really,...
Page 66 - Brummel pleases to be witty at my expense, Duchess. [Then to herself.] I must be on my guard. I don't understand Beau. [The DUCHESS seats herself on sofa. MRS. ST. AUBYN is sitting in chair just below sofa. BEAU is sitting at chair near table and SHERIDAN is still standing.] DUCHESS. Mr. Sheridan and I thought we'd come to tell you the news. We knew you were never up till noon and thought you might want to hear what's going on. [SHERIDAN now brings down chair from the back and sits about center.]...
Page 50 - REGINALD. [Boisteriously rushing to BEAU, left center.] Am I in good time, Uncle? BEAU. [Startled.] Reginald, how often have I told you to enter a room properly. You came in like — like a Mortimer, what did Mr. Reginald come like ? MORTIMER. [Reproachfully.] Like a thunderbolt, sir. BEAU. Ah, yes — like a thunderbolt; very unpleasant things, thunderbolts. Mortimer, have I ever seen a thunderbolt? MORTIMER Once, sir.
Page 203 - Shall we dine? Dine! Shall we dine? Permit me to escort Your Majesty to the table where we dine ! [Goes to chair and escorts the imaginary king to the table.] Yours is the honor and mine, Lady Cecilie, my charming vis-a-vis. Mariana — Mariana — always nearest my heart — always. Mortimer — Mortimer ! MORTIMER. [Who has been leaning against the wall with head on arm.} Yes, sir. BEAU. His Majesty waits ! [Bows to Right and Left.] Enchanted ! Enchanted ! [Waits until, apparently, they are all...

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