Euripides Plays: 2: Cyclops , Hecuba , Iphigenia in Aulis and Trojan Women

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Bloomsbury Academic, Dec 9, 1991 - Drama - 206 pages

Euripides' searching, poetic voice probes the waste and suffering of war in these plays which are set wake of the Trojan defeat to reflect the playwright's changing attitude to the real war between Athens and Sparta in his own day - 4th century BC. Hecuba is a play of ghosts and shadowy death; The Women of Troy is a searing indictment of the aftermath of defeat; Iphigenia at Aulis shows a human tragedy at the heart of the mechanics of war; and Cyclops is a satyr play which offers a comic antidote to the tragedies.

With an introduction by J. Michael Walton


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About the author (1991)

Euripides, the youngest of the three great Athenian playwrights, is thought to have written about ninety-two plays, of which seventeen tragedies and one satyr-play have survived.

J. Michael Walton is a theater historian, translator, and director, and Emeritus Professor of Drama at the University of Hull. His books on Greek tragedy include "Greek Theatre Practice, The Greek Sense of Theatre: Tragedy Revived", and "Found in Translation: Greek Drama in English".

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