Please Pass the Guilt

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Bantam Books, 1995 - Fiction - 176 pages
1 Review
A brilliant Rex Stout murder mystery featuring Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin
 
A bomb explodes in the desk drawer of a top TV executive. Was it intended for him or the man who opened the drawer? They each had enemies enough to die a dozen times over. Was it the jealous wife or the ambitious partner? The secretary who got passed around like an inter-office memo? Or the man who couldn't wash the blood off his hands? Nero Wolfe didn't want any part of it--but he was up to his neck in the toughest case of his career!

"It is always a treat to read a Nero Wolfe mystery. The man has entered our folklore."--The New York Times Book Review
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KidQuislet - LibraryThing

A well constructed mystery very much in the tradition of Nero Wolfe novels. Rex Stout 's depiction of Detective Wolfe and assistant Archie Goodwin (thru whom the story is narrated) is done perfectly ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
13
Section 4
21
Section 5
32
Section 6
43
Section 7
54
Section 8
66
Section 12
103
Section 13
115
Section 14
118
Section 15
126
Section 16
132
Section 17
135
Section 18
140
Section 19
144

Section 9
72
Section 10
82
Section 11
92
Section 20
158
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Author Rex Stout was born on December 1, 1886. A child prodigy with a gift for mathematics, Stout drifted as he became an adult, holding odd jobs in many places---cook, cabinetmaker, bellhop, hotel manager, salesman, bookkeeper, and even a guide in a pueblo. But his true talent lay in storytelling; he sold his first story, about William Howard Taft, in 1912. His most famous creation is Nero Wolfe, a 286-pound detective genius who, with sidekick Archie Goodwin, can often solve a case without leaving his room. It is the way in which the puzzle is solved that intrigues Nero Wolfe, who is much like Sherlock Holmes in his ability to use deductive reasoning. More than 60 million copies (in 24 languages) of Stout's books have been sold. Stout writes quickly, drawing upon a lifetime of impressions. He neither uses an outline nor revises; he lets his characters take over as the story develops. The classy, erudite Nero Wolfe presents for readers an alternative to the hard-boiled branch of the genre. He died on October 27, 1975

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