Please Try to Remember the First of Octember

Front Cover
Collins, 1978 - Children's stories - 48 pages
1 Review
If you want a green kangaroo, a skateboard TV or a Jeep-a-Fly kite -- just wait till the first of Octember. This delightful exercise in wish-fulfilment introduces children to the months of the year and the idea that they may not always get what they want! This title belongs to the highly acclaimed Beginner Book series developed by Dr. Seuss, in which the essential ingredients of rhyme, rhythm and repetition are combined with zany artwork and off-the-wall humour to create a range of books that will encourage even the most reluctant child to learn to read. Originally published under the pseudonym of Theo. LeSieg, Please Try to Remember the First of Octember is being relaunched with a stylish new cover design which reveals, for the first time, the true identity of the author -- Dr. Seuss himself!

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jfoti - LibraryThing

This is a story by Dr.Seuss about a holiday known as the "First of Octember" in which all of your wishes come true. I always enjoy Dr. Suess books and I believe that they are enjoyed by a very large ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JDHensley - LibraryThing

This story was about helping children learn the months of the year. The children are suspose to make a list of all the things they want and when October first gets here there will be a celebration. On ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

Theodor Seuss Geisel - better known to millions of his fans as Dr. Seuss - was born the son of a park superintendent in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1904. After studying at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, and later at Oxford University in England, he became a magazine humorist and cartoonist, and an advertising man. He soon turned his many talents to writing children's books, and his first book - And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street - was published in 1937. His greatest claim to fame was the one and only The Cat in the Hat, published in 1957, the first of a hugely successful range of early learning books known as Beginner Books.

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