Ploetz' Manual of Universal History from the Dawn of Civilization to the Outbreak of the Great War of 1914

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Houghton Mifflin, 1915 - History - 705 pages
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Page 429 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 535 - ENACTED, that, On every Such trial, the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty upon the whole matter put in issue...
Page 609 - Senate of yesterday, adopted in executive session, requesting information in regard to supposed negotiations between the United States and Great Britain and between the United States and the Republics of Nicaragua and Costa Rica, respectively.
Page 426 - That no obedience is due from this province to either or any part of the acts above mentioned ; but that they be rejected as the attempts of a wicked administration to enslave America.
Page 441 - That it is the Opinion of this House, That the further Prosecution of offensive War on the Continent of North America, for the Purpose of reducing the revolted Colonies to Obedience by Force...
Page 423 - The news was received in America with the greatest indignation. Resolutions of the house of burgesses in Virginia de1765, May 30.
Page 348 - Scotland, in doctrine, worship, discipline, and government, against our common enemies; the reformation of religion in the kingdoms of England and Ireland, in doctrine, worship, discipline, and government, according to the Word of God, and the example of the best reformed churches...
Page 427 - Britain, and that it was necessary that the exercise of every kind of authority under the crown should be totally suppressed, and all the powers of government exerted under the authority of the people of the colonies.
Page 385 - That king James II. having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and having, by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, violated the fundamental laws, and withdrawn himself out of the kingdom ; has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 385 - It was moved that King James the Second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom by breaking the original contract between king and people, and, by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, had abdicated the government, and that the throne had thereby become vacant.

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