Pocahontas: Alias Matoaka, and Her Descendants Through Her Marriage at Jamestown, Virginia, in April, 1614, with John Rolfe, Gentleman; Including the Names of Alfriend, Archer, Bentley, Bernard, Bland, Boling, Branch, Cabell, Catlett, Cary, Dandridge, Dixon, Douglas, Duval, Eldridge, Ellett, Ferguson, Field, Fleming, Gay, Gordon, Griffin, Grayson, Harrison, Hubard, Lewis, Logan, Markham, Meade, McRae, Murray, Page, Poythress, Randolph, Robertson, Skipwith, Stanard, Tazewel, Walke, West, Whittle, and Others

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J. W. Randolph & English, 1887 - 84 pages
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BUYER BEWARE!... THIS IS ABSURD FICTION!
Is this a "children's book" - or is it a repetition of "propaganda" from a by-gone era????... It's UNBELIEVABLE to me that this fictional BS could even be
printed!... I am a card-carrying member of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe of Virginia... but, ANYONE with factual knowledge of 1600's era "Virginia History" would instantly realize that, in truth, Captain Samuel Argall kidnapped Pocahontas from Passapatanzy (in current day King George County, Va.) while threatening her uncle, Patawomeck lesser Chief Japasaws (also known as Iopassus). In "payment" for his coerced cooperation to "help get her on his ship", Argall gave Japasaws and his wife the notorious "copper pot" (which is still a much debated item by historical scholars). In the book description (of this "absurd work of fiction"), it states that Powhatan willingly gave up his favorite daughter, Pocahontas, to Argall in exchange for this shiny trinket!... In reality, Chief Powhatan was NOWHERE NEAR when the kidnapping of Pocahontas took place!... The excerpt from the book description says: "Captain Argall had with him a large shining copper kettle, which Powhatan thought was a gigantic precious stone. Powhatan admired the kettle immensely, and made several offers to buy it; and at last Argall said that he should have it if he would give him Pocahontas in exchange. The chief joyfully consented, and Pocahontas, who was always glad to be with the English, was taken to their camp."... I am just TOTALLY IN SHOCK that, in this day and age, this kind of fictional sugar-coated "GARBAGE" is even allowed to reach the stage of being on a printed page! 

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Page 22 - ... named Opachisco, to give her as his deputy in the church, and two of his sonnes to see the marriage solemnized, which was accordingly done about the...
Page 25 - ... for the good of this plantation, for the honour of our countrie, for the glory of God, for my owne salvation, and for the converting to the true knowledge of God and Jesus Christ, an unbeleeving creature, namely, Pocahontas.
Page 25 - I regard not what becometh of me; nor am I out of hope but one day to see my country, nor so void of friends nor mean in birth but there to obtain a match to my great content...
Page 24 - ... affection: but for the good of this plantation, for the honour of our countrie, for the glory of God, for my...
Page 21 - Rolfe had bin in love with Pocahuntas, and she with him, which thing at the instant that we were in parlee with them...
Page 21 - ... and arrowes to welcome vs, here they dared vs to come a shoare, a thing which we purposed before, so a shoare we went, . . . two of Powhatans sonnes being very desirous to see their sister who was there present ashore with vs, came vnto vs, at the sight of whom, and her well fare, whom they suspected to be worse intreated, though they had often heard the contrary, they much reioiced, and promised that they would vndoubtedly perswade their father to redeeme her, and to conclude a firme peace foreuer...
Page 22 - ... uncle of hirs, named Opachisco, to give her as his deputy in the church, and two of his sonnes to see the marriage solemnized...
Page 19 - But that which is best, one Pocahontas or Matoa, the daughter of Powhatan, is married to an honest and discreete English gentleman, Master Rolfe, and that after she had openly renounced her country, idolatry, professed the faith of Jesus Christ, and was baptized, which thing Sir Thomas Dale had laboured a long time to ground in her.
Page 1 - ... and State. In 1858, his remains were removed from "Kippax" to the mausoleum, at Blandford Cemetery, erected by his great grandson; he m. (first) 1675, Jane Rolfe, d. 1676; dau. of Lieut. Thomas and Jane (Poythress) Rolfe; gr.-dau. of Col. John Rolfe, and his wife, Princess Pocahontas Rebecca, dau. of Powhatan, the great Werowance and ruler of all the Indian tribes, which at the advent of the English, inhabited Virginia; (second) 1681, Anne Stith, dau. of John Drury Stith, of Brunswick Co., Va....
Page 68 - He composed and wrote in a peculiar, clear and graphic style; and attained an artificial faculty of speech almost equal to natural. His grace of manner, vivacity, power of imitation, made him the wonder and admiration of strangers, and the delight of friends and relatives.

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