Pocket Posh Word Power: 120 Words You Should Know

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Andrews McMeel Publishing, May 31, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 160 pages
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A pretty, purse-sized package of words that everyone should know.We’ve taken our million-selling Pocket Posh®format(over 1.5 million copies in print) and filled it with a selection of words you should know for clear communication.

Words such as propinquity, armillary, and farrago should be vocabulary staples. Consult Pocket Posh Word Power: 120 Words You Should Know to determine other additions to your lexicon.

This Pocket Posh Word Power collection promises a gargantuan vocabulary boost inside an effortlessly portable, ergonomic package that features fun cover embellishments, an elastic band closure, and a convenient lay-flat binding. In addition, each entry provides pronunciation, part of speech, definition, usage in a sentence, and etymology information. 

 

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Contents

Section 1
20
Section 2
44
Section 3
52
Section 4
62
Section 5
78
Section 6
102
Section 7
156
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Wordnik is a place for all the words, and everything known about them. Their goal is to show you as much information as possible, as fast as they can find it, for every word in English, and to give you a place where you can make your own opinions about words known. Traditional dictionaries make you wait until they've found what they consider to be "enough" information about a word before they will show it to you. Wordnik knows you don't want to wait. Before founding Wordnik, Erin McKean edited The New Oxford American Dictionary. She continues to serve as the editor of the language quarterly Verbatim and is the author of multiple books, including That's Amore and the entire Weird and Wonderful Words series. She maintains multiple blogs, including "A Dress a Day" and "Dictionary Evangelist." "Ms. McKean is part of the next wave of top lexicographers who have already or may soon take over guardianship of the nation's language, and who disprove Samuel Johnson's definition of a lexicographer as 'a harmless drudge.'" --The New York Times

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