Poems. With Notes. By John Walters, ...

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J. and J. Fletcher; and by G. Kearsly, London, 1780 - 145 pages
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Page 121 - ... till it mimicked wings. He let it dry as hard as possible. The learned immediately pronounced it a dragon ; and one of them sent an accurate description of it to Dr.
Page 95 - ... kind. Say, silvan quire, what dire offence Hath stain'd your native innocence, That danger thus, with ceaseless course, Pursues your flight, your haunts explores ? Oft have I seen your callow care Hard-struggling in the birdlime snare : So the rash youth, in grief I said, If once the path of vice he tread, Caught in the toils of treachery, In vain long labours to be free : But ne'er hath pride your minds possess'd, Harmless offspring of the nest, Nor folly e'er your hearts beguiled, Nor guilt...
Page 53 - To this great ship, which round the world has run, And match'd, in race, the chariot of the sun, This Pythagorean ship (for it may claim, Without presumption, so deserved a name, By knowledge once, and transformation now), In her new shape this sacred port allow.
Page 121 - Bedford observes to me on the word dragon as follows : — Mr Jacob Bobart, botany professor of Oxford, did, about forty years ago, find a dead rat in the...
Page 93 - ... Where of hills a mighty mound Rears its magic circle round : There in some villa's calm recess Health my careless days shall bless. There lead me forth at break of morn, Ere sounds the hunter's buglehorn, There oft shall win my willing ear Your unbought harmony to hear ; Yet my grateful hands shall pay With due reward your carols gay ; And to your bills the crumbs afford That fall from my unpamper'd board, And build for you the winter shed, The wicker'd roof and mossy bed. To your arbour's private...
Page 93 - ... Bemoans her absent Philomel, Or to the trees in piteous strains Still of her plunderM nest complains ; And all ye various-plumed train, Who haunt the stream or wing the plain ; Hence, gentle birds, spontaneous flee With peace, with safety, and with me, And seek with me the distant vales That smooth the rugged brow of Wales, Where of hills a mighty mound Rears its magic circle round : There in some villa's calm recess Health my careless days shall bless. There lead me forth at break of morn, Ere...
Page 9 - I will not blot his name out of the book of life." Underneath is the figure of a woman, sitting before the stairs of the old library, holding in one hand a key, and in the other a book, wherein the greatest part of the alphabet appears ; and behind are seen three small books shut, inscribed with the names of Priscianus, Diomedes, and Donatus. Beneath all are engraven these words : Memoriae...
Page 42 - London : though it is to be lamented that his whole library was not given by his executors according to his intention once ; for the fire of the Temple destroyed in...
Page 9 - Non delebo nomen ejus de libro vitae ; ie " I will not blot his name out of the book of life." Underneath is the figure of a woman, sitting before the stairs of the old library, holding in one hand a key, and in the other a book, wherein the greatest part of the alphabet appears ; and...
Page 14 - Plays, and an infinite number that are daily printed of very unworthy matters — handling such books as one thinks both the Keeper and UnderKeeper should disdain to seek out, to deliver to any man. Haply some plays may be worthy the keeping — but hardly one in forty...

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