Poems of the Plains, and Songs of the Solitudes: Together with "The Rhyme of the Border War."

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1888 - Kansas - 329 pages
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Page 211 - ... less obviously rich because more complicated ; but so long as the human heart throbs with anguish or swells with pride, so long as it flutters with love or pants with passion, so long as it heaves with despair or bounds with hope, so long will the material be ready whenever the true workman comes. In variety and depth of meaning the nineteenth century will not, surely, disappoint those who have the discernment to extricate, and the ability to exhibit, the treasures it supplies. The eagle eye...
Page 227 - God secretes in places lone and still The rarest products of His will ; For contact with the world disarms His fairest flowers of half their charms.
Page 321 - ... likewise preserves Chaucer. Rabelais and old Montaigne continue in literature despite of their impurities ; and to think of Shakspeare dying, would be to conceive the extinction of letters or our race. All these men are deathless brothers ; and Burns is amongst them. His poetry is thoroughly human — a poetry which reproduces as we read it all the feelings of our wayward nature ; which shows how man was made to be merry and how he was made to mourn ; which enters the soul on its sunny or its...
Page 211 - ... into diamonds, master minds will never cease to reveal beauties that lie at our very feet, but lie there unobserved. He whose mind is burnished by contact with the world most fully collects into a single focus all the interacting rays of the light around him; he who bends his ear most patiently to the ' loud roaring loom of time ' will best extract a harmony from its seeming discords.
Page 211 - An age like our own, thronged with such varied activities, throbbing with such manifold energies, struggling so fiercely towards the light, can never be regarded as hopelessly prosaic. Poetry is not dead because it sleeps ; it is ' immortal as the heart of man,' if poets depend on themselves, and not on external circumstances.
Page 32 - O great protagonist on the field of fame! BEAUTIFUL WOMAN. BEAUTIFUL woman, thou art. True to womanhood, sweet! God places in thy heart A wealth of love that's meet. And why, I cannot tell! But oh, thy voice to me Sounds like some far-off bell That wakes sweet memory! FORGIVE THIS TEAR. FORGIVE! forgive! this burning tear, Now wrung in memory from my heart In memory of the past, so dear, That far hath gone from me — apart Of heaven I'll see on earth no more — A long'd-for joy forever flown, Like...
Page 34 - ... sore, Their cries of vengeance on the night-winds roar! V. He halts! the outlaw halts to hear! A moment in the stirrup stands — His soul is centered in his ear, O'er his hot brow he draws his hands — His sinewy hands which oft had choked death back. When foes were close upon his dreaded track. VI. He spurs his steed, and onward flies Beneath the stars' and moon's soft light; Like some swift comet down the skies. He passes through the shades of night; Flies onward toward the yellow sea away,...
Page 35 - ... When summer laughs along the lovely land. IX. His foes knew not the cost of hate When hunting down this man of crime — This son of war, this child of fate. Who'd hurled scores to etern from time; Whose spirits rose when armies greatest warred. When blood flowed most and battle loudest roared. X. He long defied both death and time. Though none saw why, how it was so — For with a boldness rash, sublime, He reckless rushed upon the foe — He whom some power unknown protected well! Some power...
Page 34 - ... passes through the shades of night; Flies onward toward the yellow sea away, Where cloud on cloud pavilioned, darkling lay. VII. He spurs his steed, whose sides are wet With foam which shames the whitest snow — His eyes blaze fire, his teeth are set, He's armed and ready for the foe, As e'er he'd been, when far and fierce and free, He roamed a pirate, dreaded, o'er the sea. VIII. Ah! fast and well his foes must run To overtake him in his flight; His courser is the swiftest one Whose feet spurn...
Page 293 - Beecher-Tilton controversy, can look without some anxiety to the utterly unrestricted mingling of men and. women, in periods of great excitement, and under the strongest inducements to use whatever means of influence may prove most potent in dealing with one another...

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