Poems on several occasions

Front Cover
F. Milward, 1794
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 58 - Welcome sweet harbinger of Spring ! Thou softest warbler of the grove ! Thou bid'st the dreary woodlands ring With strains of music, joy and love. Tho" scarce a swelling bud is seen To deck the hedge-row, shrub or tree; Tho' Nature boasts no vivid green, Yet is gay Spring announc'd by thee. When, rising from th'unblossom'd spray, Thy sooty fav'rite meets thine eye, How quick thou wing'st thy liquid way, Regardless of the stormy sky ! True love, and well-try'd faith, can bear, Unmov'd, the chilling...
Page 167 - ... sides adown Graze the shepherd's bleating care,— There the flow'ry pasture fair : Lower, down their fertile sides The patient hind his plough-share guides. Where future harvests waving smile, And health and plenty crown his toil. Distant, the tall rock rough and hoar Nods o'er Sabrina's rapid wave, Where her shelving sedge-crown'd shore Invites the blue-ey'd nymph to lave; While the whisp'ring zephyrs breathe Thro
Page 51 - On the Author's Husband Desiring her to Write Some Verses Verses, my Love! as soon cou'd I Without a wing or feather fly: My head, with other matters fraught, No more attempts poetic thought: — Yet, as I hold your soVreign sway, In spite of genius I obey. Ye Muses, aid me to explore The shadowy grots, and mountains hoar, Where ye your tuneful influence shed, — And twine with bays your poet's head. ERATO hears my invocation, My bosom glows with inspiration, Instant the fairy scenes appear, Pierian...
Page 53 - To soothe our passions into peace, To twine in union sweet the kindred mind, Th'endearing ties of social life to bind In chains so strong, yet soft, they but with life can cease. The mutual int'rest all reserve disclaiming, The scheme of pleasure each for other framing, The kindling transports of parental love, Which the sweet smiles of innocence can move, Are thine alone, O HYMEN! to bestow, Which hearts that do not feel them cannot know: — — But hark! — my darling infant cries, And each poetic...
Page 52 - Without a wing or feather fly: My head, with other matters fraught, No more attempts poetic thought: — Yet, as I hold your soVreign sway, In spite of genius I obey. Ye Muses, aid me to explore The shadowy grots, and mountains hoar, Where ye your tuneful influence shed, — And twine with bays your poet's head. ERATO hears my invocation, My bosom glows with inspiration, Instant the fairy scenes appear, Pierian sounds salute my ear: — CONNUBIAL LOVE! enchanting theme! Sweet subject of my muse-rapt...
Page 112 - Hear the rneek-ey'd nymph intreat, her pleadings disregard, In a cause so good and great, Where so ample's the reward : Sons of affluence, freely give, Tenfold blessings you'll receive. See the helpless...
Page 119 - Epilogue, spoken after a Play, performed at Walsall, for the benefit of the Widows and Orphans of the Soldiers and Sailors who shou'd die or be killed during the War, 1793 ioo Sonnet, on removing a Bay-Tree from a Northern to a Southern aspect 104 To Mrs.
Page 114 - Rescu'd from the sinful throng, Still address the grateful pray'r, Still attune the pious song,— For the bounteous friends that give Alms that teach the soul to live ! MORNING HYMN, SUNG BY THE CONGREGATION OF WAI.SALL.
Page 118 - O ! lead us by thy saving grace, Through life's deceitful thorny way, Till we appear before thy face, In the bright realms of endless day.
Page 117 - Lord, before thy awful throne, Again our souls in duty bend ; To thee our wants and woes are known, To us thy pow'rful aid extend.

Bibliographic information