Polish Americans: An Ethnic Community

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VNR AG, 1995 - History - 181 pages
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"In this history of "Polonia" - the community of Polish immigrants and their descendants residing in America - James S. Pula defines what it has meant to be Polish in America since the first large groups of Poles left the Old Country - what they called Stary Kraj - for the New more than 150 years ago." "The Polish American community has long been identified with three characteristics that the early immigrants brought with them to America, writes Pula: "an affection and concern for their ancestral homeland, a deep religious faith, and a sense of shared cultural values." Prominent among these values are family loyalty, a desire for property ownership, and pride in self-sufficiency. Throughout the book Pula returns to these themes as Polish Americans have played them out against the backdrop of Polish and American history."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

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Contents

two The Old World and the New 18701900
15
The Organization ofPolonia
30
four Polonia in the Progressive Era 19001920
45
five Emergence of the Second Generation 19201940
67
ffi World War II 19391945
84
seven The Cold War 19451954
102
eight Restructuring Polonia 19461980_J
117
nine Defining the Future
137
Notes
147
Selected Bibliography
165
Index
175
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About the author (1995)

James S. Pula is dean of Metropolitan College at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

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