Political Protest and Street Art: Popular Tools for Democratization in Hispanic Countries

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1993 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 173 pages
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This first cross-national book-length study of street art as political protest and communication focuses on art forms traditionally used by collectives and state interests in the Hispanic world--posters, wallpaintings, graffiti, murals, shirts, buttons, and stickers, for example. Professor Chaffee examines the motives behind the use of street art as propaganda and seeks to explain how it is effective. Using field research and a sociopolitical approach, he assesses contemporary street art in Spain, the Basque country, Argentina, and Brazil. He shows how street art is a barometer of popular conflicts and sentiments across the political spectrum. This comparative analysis is intended for students, teachers, and professionals in the fields of communication, political science, history, and popular culture.

 

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Contents

IV
3
V
23
VI
35
VII
37
VIII
69
IX
101
X
131
XI
161
XII
165
XIII
169
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About the author (1993)

LYMAN G. CHAFFEE, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science, California State University at Dominguez Hills, specializes in comparative politics and popular culture. He has written at length on public art and propaganda.

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