Political Sociology: A Critical Introduction

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NYU Press, Mar 1, 2000 - Political Science - 248 pages
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". . . an excellent introductory text."
--Robert Jackall, Williams College

"This is an extremely well-written and engaging book. It takes an upbeat and argumentative style that brings the subject matter to life . . . It strikes the right balance between covering the core theoretical and conceptual issues associated with the subject while also adopting a central thesis that gives structure to the field and stimulates further enquiry."
--Paul Connolly, University of Ulster

What is the relationship between the state and civil society? Which institutions truly wield power in the modern world? Keith Faulks tackles these questions as he introduces the key conceptual debates and approaches in contemporary political sociology. Important and topical issues including globalization, the rise of new social movements, neo-liberalism, citizenship, political culture and political participation are explored alongside critiques of key sociologists such as Giddens, Beck and Etzioni.

This is the definitive introduction to the key processes that are changing the nature of politics and society in the modern world. The focus is on clarity, accessibility, and the needs of the student: boxes and charts are used to highlight key facts and figures, and a guide to further reading is included to encourage further exploration of this fascinating subject.

 

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political sociology by keith faulks

Contents

Globalisation
53
NeoLiberalism
71
New Social Movements
87
Political Culture
107
Citizenship
126
Political Participation
143
Contemporary Theories of the State and Civil Society
165
Global Governance
187
Conclusion
211
Guide to Further Reading
217
Bibliography
223
Index
237
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About the author (2000)

KEITH FAULKS is Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Central Lancashire.

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