Politically Incorrect Nutrition: Finding Reality in the Mire of Food Industry Propaganda

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Vital Health Publishing, 2004 - Health & Fitness - 165 pages
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Did you know that some noncaloric artificial sweeteners can actually make you fat—or even kill you? Did you know that the overconsumption of certain soy products can upset your hormonal balance and lead to hypothyroidism? Most people didn't, until now. Politically Incorrect Nutrition exposes many current and widely held beliefs foisted on both consumers and health-care practitioners by well-oiled, agenda-driven food industry propaganda. It analyzes popular claims and reveals what, in fact, is healthy—and what is decidedly unhealthy—by exploring the most current and objective scientific data regarding good nutrition.


If you want to provide the best possible food for yourself and your family, or if you simply want to learn the truth behind the many food myths that are presented to us day after day, Politically Incorrect Nutrition is must reading.

 

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If this book doesn't change your life, then at least, it should make you start thinking for yourself. Easy to comprehend and backed by good eviedence.

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Contents

A Cup of Contaminants
1
No Wonder Food
7
Some Good News
17
Can Beef and Butter Keep You Thin?
33
The Poisoning of America Part I
39
The Poisoning of America Part II
49
More Than Just Calcium
57
Some Milk is Not Good for Anybody
67
Too Much of a Good Thing?
93
The Public as Guinea Pigs
101
Ethical and Dietary Considerations
107
Is There One?
124
The Nonpyramid Food Guide
132
Notes
134
Index
155
Endnote
161

More Good Cholesterol News
73
What Have We Done to Our Food?
85
Resources
163
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Michael Barbee, CDC, is an educator who has taught in private and public schools for thirty years. While specializing in the field of health and nutrition, he became a Certified Diet Counselor through thenbsp; Institute for Educational Therapy in Cotati, California. Along with teaching, Mr. Barbee enjoys speaking to groups concerned with the relationship of diet to health and disease.

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