Politics in New Zealand

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Auckland University Press, 2004 - Political Science - 344 pages
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This revised edition of a classic introduction to the New Zealand political, constitutional, and electoral system covers recent elections and the constitutional and legal changes that have attracted the attention of the international community. Using a pluralist theory of the state, it describes the history and practice of New Zealand government. Political parties and special-interest groups, the governmental hierarchy, and the public sector are discussed with information on how these different influences affect the political scene. The historical perspective provided offers a vision of the evolutionary nature of New Zealand politics and the interactions that drive changes.
 

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Contents

A pluralist theory of the state
1
The plural society
20
The constitution
50
The Cabinet and prime minister
73
Parliament
99
The public sector and the public service
136
Courts and tribunals
168
Local and regional government
190
Interest groups
208
Political parties
233
Elections and voters
265
The media
288
Pluralist democracy under strain
309
Bibliography
329
Index
340
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About the author (2004)

Richard Mulgan is the director of the policy and governance program at the Australian National University. He is a former professor at Otago University and Auckland University. He is the author of Holding Power to Account: Accountability in Modern Democracies. He is a former member of the Royal Commission on the Electoral System in New Zealand. Peter Aimer is a professor of political studies at the University of Auckland. He is the coauthor of the 2002 New Zealand election study "Voters Veto."

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