Portrait of the artist as a young ape: a caprice

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Dalkey Archive Press, 1995 - Fiction - 121 pages
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A rambling novel of dreams and reflection inspired by a library in a German castle full of books and maps. The narrator is a young Frenchman who works for the owner. The author is a leading practitioner of the French nouveau roman. He wrote Mobile.

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PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG APE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Butor's self-styled ``caprice,'' first published in 1967 in France, is an autobiographical fiction in vintage nouveau roman style—though the refracted, elliptical, thickly descriptive narrative isn't ... Read full review

PORTRAIT OF ARTIST AS YOUNG AP

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A champion of the French nouveau roman, Butor here describes his development as a writer, but this novel does not resemble Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In post-World War II Germany ... Read full review

Contents

The Color of Eyes
9
Hungarian
12
Days of Reading
14
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Michel Butor's early education was with the Jesuits, and he subsequently received degrees from the Sorbonne in philosophy. His thesis for his diplome d'etudes superieures was titled Mathematics and the Idea of Necessity. He has taught in Egypt, England, and Greece as well as in the United States. He is currently a professor of literature at the University of Geneva. Although technically and intellectually challenging, Butor's work has enjoyed considerable general popularity. A Change of Heart (1959) was awarded the Prix Theophraste Renaudot, one of the major French literary prizes, in 1957 and put Butor before the general public. The subject of his novels is consciousness, frequently presented in the form of an interior monologue and described in painstaking detail. Critics consider Degrees (1960) a complex novel that provides a brilliant picture of the perennial schoolboy-and the perennial teacher. Butor has also written a number of stereoscopies, or works on different levels in which the reader must participate actively. His literary and art criticism are contained in Repertoire I to IV and Illustrations I to IV respectively.

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