Positive and Trusting Relationships with Children in Early Years Settings

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SAGE, Jun 22, 2010 - Education - 144 pages
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To attain EYPS, candidates must demonstrate that they can establish fair, respectful, trusting and constructive relationships with children. This book helps those on EYPS pathways to understand and develop these important relationships. It begins by examining trust as a key theme and goes on to discuss how to 'tune in' to individual children and how to 'tune out' or say goodbye. It gives practical advice on helping children build resilience and take risks. Positive relationships with children are examined within the context of relationships with others and the text also considers how practitioners can support other professionals in their setting.
 

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Contents

Foreword from the series editors
Time to tunein and
Respect for self and others
boundaries
Trusting relationships as a secure foundation for childrens learning
Supporting other Early Years practitioners to build positive relationships
Reflection and learning as an Early Years Professional
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About the author (2010)

Jessica Johnson is Senior Lecturer in Early Years at Kingston University and currently Programme Leader for the Sector-Endorsed Foundation Degree in Early Years, Course Leader for the BA(Hons) ‘top-up’ in Early Years Education and Care, EYPS Senior Assessor and Project Leader for the Kingston, Merton and Richmond EYP Support Network. Rite of passage to this role started in the National Health Service, tuning in to babies, young children and their families at The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street. They initiated ongoing curiosity in child development - specifically social and emotional relationships. Chameleon-like, she has experienced first-hand the challenges in creating positive, trusting relationships through roles in health, social care, education and as a mediator in the voluntary sector.

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