Postcolonial Migrants and Identity Politics: Europe, Russia, Japan and the United States in Comparison

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Ulbe Bosma, Jan Lucassen, Gert Oostindie
Berghahn Books, May 30, 2012 - History - 278 pages
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These transfers of sovereignty resulted in extensive, unforeseen movements of citizens and subjects to their former countries. The phenomenon of postcolonial migration affected not only European nations, but also the United States, Japan and post-Soviet Russia. The political and societal reactions to the unexpected and often unwelcome migrants was significant to postcolonial migrants' identity politics and how these influenced metropolitan debates about citizenship, national identity and colonial history. The contributors explore the historical background and contemporary significance of these migrations and discuss the ethnic and class composition and the patterns of integration of the migrant population.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 Postcolonial Immigrants in France and their Descendants
23
Chapter 2 Postcolonial Migrants in Britain
61
Chapter 3 Postcolonial Migrants in the Netherlands
95
Chapter 4 Postcolonial Portugal
127
Chapter 5 Return of the Natives?
155
Chapter 6 Postcolonial Immigration and Identity Formation in Europe since 1945
181
Chapter 7 The Puerto Rican Diasporato the United States
193
Bibliography
227
Notes on Contributors
251
Index
255
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About the author (2012)

Ulbe Bosma is Senior Researcher at the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam.

Jan Lucassen is Senior Researcher at the International Institute of Social History and Professor at the Free University in Amsterdam.

Gert Oostindie is Director of the KITLV/Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden and Professor of Caribbean History at Leiden University.

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