Potter's American Monthly, Volumes 14-15

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J. E. Potter and Company, 1880 - American literature
 

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Page 4 - I see before me the gladiator lie : He leans upon his hand ; his manly brow Consents to death, but conquers agony, And his drooped head sinks gradually low ; And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy, one by one, Like the first of a thunder-shower ; and now The arena swims around him ; he is gone, Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hailed the wretch who won.
Page 316 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Page 138 - All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone. We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could call our own.
Page 273 - And he said, BLESSED be the Lord God of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, And he shall dwell in the tents of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant.
Page 329 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine...
Page 4 - Or view the Lord of the unerring bow, The God of Life, and Poesy, and Light — The Sun in human limbs arrayed, and brow All radiant from his triumph in the fight ; The shaft hath just been shot— the arrow bright With an Immortal's vengeance— in his eye And nostril beautiful Disdain, and Might And Majesty, flash their full lightnings by, Developing in that one glance the Deity.
Page 328 - Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!
Page 317 - Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose : Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant; meanwhile murmuring waters fall Down the slope hills, dispersed, or in a lake, That to the fringed bank with myrtle crown'd Her crystal mirror holds, unite their streams.
Page 317 - Imbrowned the noontide bowers : thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view ; — Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm, Others, whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable, Hesperian fables * true, If true, here only, and of delicious taste...
Page 374 - Stern Lawgiver ! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads ; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through Thee, are fresh and strong.

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