Potter's Wheel: One Man's Search For Love... And The Truth

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, 2004 - Fiction - 292 pages
0 Reviews
TEASER FOR POTTER'S WHEEL Adam Potter sits in a hot, 80-year-old courtroom with rivers of sweat running down his back. His third wife, Jeanette is dead. Not only are his accusers numerous, but Adam himself has admitted that Jeanette died by his hand. How can anyone else comprehend that her death wasn't murder, or even a mercy killing? Adam Potter is a good man, always has been. He's made mistakes, as we all have. Loving Jeannette wasn't one of them. The truth will surely come out that he loved three other women during his lifetime of less than 50 years. Even today each holds a different place in his heart that doesn't diminish the value or stature of any. Nevertheless, it appears that his journeys of the spirit with the women he loved have finally led him to this sticky situation. Recalling his father's declaring, it is "this world, and then the next." Adam isn't ready to contemplate "the next" quite so soon. His thoughts move back to focus on where he was and how he had gotten there. At one time he would have been despondent, or even sad. But, if there were a benefit from all this, it was his arrival. Not the succumbing to depression or worse, but the acceptance of the fates, the detachment from this world, self-recognition. In POTTER'S WHEEL, the author explores the inner reaches the soul in the search for love and happiness. Written entirely in the first person, from a man's point of view, about a man's feelings, the novel takes the reader through the turbulent times of the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s. It demonstrates the compelling influence of the ever-changing culture. Adam's life is tense, warm, funny, horrifying and sad as he moves from one emotion to another with ease. "I mademistakes all right," I thought. "It's amazing that I lived through them." This exploration of one man's soul is an especially important novel for today.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Bibliographic information