Pottery in Archaeology

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 13, 1993 - Antiques & Collectibles - 269 pages
The study of pottery has become increasingly important over the past century, providing the archaeologist with information on many aspects of the past, including chronology, trade and technology. Recent scientific developments and statistical techniques have further contributed to this analysis of pottery. Pottery in Archaeology covers information obtained from over fifty years practical experience in the field and the latest research. The book will be essential reading for students, field archaeologists and anyone interested in working with pottery.
 

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Contents

History of Pottery Studies
3
The arthistorical phase
5
The typological phase
8
The contextual phase
13
Parallel themes ethnography
15
Parallel themes technology
17
Parallel themes scientific methods
18
Parallel themes quantification
21
Themes in Ceramic Studies
111
Making Pottery
113
Raw materials for pottery manufacture
114
Clay preparation
117
Surface treatments
126
Pottery Fabrics
132
Visual examination
135
Petrological analysis
140

The Potential of Pottery as Archaeological Evidence
23
Manufacture and technology
30
Sherds in the soil
32
The playground of ideas
33
Implications for practice
34
Practicalities A Guide to Pottery Processing and Recording
37
Integration with Research Designs
39
Life in the Pot Shed
44
Collection policy and practice
46
Initial processing
48
Equipment
49
Retrieval procedures
50
Cleaning and drying
51
Initial recording and processing
52
Initial viewing and spotdating
54
Sorting
55
Physical reconstruction
56
Cataloguing
57
Computers in pottery research
62
To keep or not to keep
65
Fabric Analysis
67
Firing characteristics
68
Inclusions
70
The matrix
71
Creating and using a fabric typeseries
72
Classification of Form and Decoration
76
Creating and using a form typeseries
77
Describing shapes
79
Vessels and sherds
80
Illustration
87
Drawing pottery
89
Photography
94
Pottery Archives
98
Practical issues
99
Publication
105
Layout of report
106
Indexing and correlation
107
Microfiche and microtype computer media
108
Summary
109
Compositional analysis
144
Comparison between techniques
149
Form
152
The typeseries approach
153
Measurementbased classification
155
Geometric shapes
158
Mathematical curves as descriptions of shape
159
Classification of manufacturing stages
163
Quantification
166
The sampling basis
167
Uses of comparisons of assemblages
168
Practicalities
171
Are the assemblages really different?
173
How big should an assemblage be?
175
Spinoffs
178
A case study
179
Discussion
181
Chronology
182
Pinning down dates
185
Bringing the evidence together
189
A case study
194
Summary
196
Production and Distribution
197
Distribution of artefact types
199
Sources of supply to a site
202
The identification of source from distribution
203
Assemblages and Sites
207
Sherdlinks
209
Field survey data
212
Sherds after burial
214
The role of quantification
215
Pottery and Function
217
Function production and distribution
226
Symbolic meaning
227
The future of pottery studies
229
Appendix
231
Bibliography
243
Index
263
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