Poverty and Un-British Rule in India

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S. Sonnenschein, 1901 - Great Britain - 675 pages
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dont waste my time
I had asked for the historical significance n not this stupid

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With this book Naoroji signals the beginnings of the Indian Nationalist struggle against the British rule. He argues that the «drain» of wealth, or the unilateral transfer of resources from India to Britain, was the principal cause of poverty in India, as when Britain, for example, puts the average tax burden in India at twice that of contemporary England, although average income there was fifteen times greater at that point in time. Clearly his reasons to write about poverty were nationalist and political. 

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Page 410 - 3 and 4 William IV., cap. 85. 1833. " That no Native of the said territories, nor any naturalborn subject of his Majesty resident therein, shall, by reason only of his religion, place of birth, descent, colour, or any of them, be disabled from holding any place, office, or employment under the said Company.
Page 94 - It is our further will that, so far as may be, our subjects, of whatever race or creed, be freely and impartially admitted to offices in our service, the duties of which they may be qualified, by their education, ability, and integrity, duly to discharge.
Page 90 - be it enacted that no Native of the said territories,* nor [any natural-born subject of His Majesty resident therein, shall, by reason only of his religion, place of birth, descent, colour, or any of them, be disabled from holding any place, office, or employment under the said Company.
Page 642 - fulfil. And it is our further will that, so far as may be, our subjects, of whatever race or creed, shall be freely and impartially admitted to offices in our service, the duties which they may be qualified by their education, ability, and integrity
Page 496 - We hold ourselves bound to the Natives of our Indian territory by the same obligations of duty which bind us to all our other subjects; and these obligations, by the blessing of Almighty God, we shall faithfully and conscientiously fulfil." " And it is our further will that, so far as may be,
Page 642 - In their prosperity will be our strength, in their contentment our security, and in their gratitude our best reward. And may the God of all Power grant to us and those in authority under us strength to carry out these our wishes for the good of our people.
Page v - We hold ourselves bound to the Natives of our Indian territories by the same obligations of duty which bind us to all our other subjects, and these obligations, by the blessing of Almighty God, we shall faithfully and conscientiously fulfil. "When, by the blessing of Providence, Internal
Page v - That no Native of the said territories, nor any natural-born subject of His Majesty resident therein, shall by reason only of his religion, place of birth, descent, or any of them, be disabled from holding any place, office, or employment under the said
Page 237 - I have no fears. The path of duty is plain before us ; and it is also the path of wisdom, of national prosperity, of national honour To have found a great people sunk in the lowest depths of misery and superstition, to have so ruled them as to have made them desirous and capable of all the
Page 495 - India), nor any natural born subject of his Majesty resident therein, shall, by reason only of his religion, place of birth, descent, or any of them, be disabled from holding any place, office, or employment under the said Company.

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