Practical Dog Training: Or, Training Vs. Breaking

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Forest and stream publishing Company, 1885 - Dogs - 163 pages
 

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Contents

I
9
II
18
III
27
IV
35
V
43
VI
51
VII
70
VIII
83
IX
91
X
96
XI
112
XII
139
XIII
143
Copyright

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Page 146 - Food,' placing also by the side an empty saucer, covered by a plain card. ' Van ' soon learnt to distinguish between the two, and the next stage was to teach him to bring me the card ; this he now does, and hands it to me quite prettily, and I then give him a bone, or a little food, or take him out, according to the card brought. He still brings sometimes a plain card, in which case I point out his error, and he then takes it back and changes it. This however does not often happen. Yesterday morning,...
Page 146 - Yesterday morning, for instance, he brought me the card with ' food ' on it nine times in succession, selecting it from among other plain cards, though I changed the relative position every time. No one who sees him can doubt that he understands the act of bringing the card with the word ' food ' on it, as a request for something to eat, and that he distinguishes between it and a plain card. I also believe that he distinguishes, for instance, between the card with the word ' food ' on it and the...
Page 145 - I believe that it arises very much from the fact that hitherto we have tried to teach animals, rather than to learn from them— to convey our ideas to them, rather than to devise any language, or code of signals, by means of which they might communicate theirs to us. No doubt the former process is interesting and instructive, but it does not carry us very far.
Page 144 - Miss Martineau once remarked that, considering how long we have lived in close association with animals, it is astonishing how little we know about them, and especially about their mental condition. This applies with especial force to our domestic animals, and above all of course to...
Page 145 - ... which they might communicate theirs to us. The former may be more important from a utilitarian point of view, though even this is questionable, but psychologically it is far less interesting. Under these circumstances it occurred to me whether some such system as that followed with deaf mutes, and especially by Dr. Howe with Laura Bridgman, might not prove very instructive if adapted to the case of dogs. I have tried this in a small way with a black poodle named "Van." I took two pieces of cardboard...
Page 149 - I keep a card always on the floor in my dressing-room, and whenever he is thirsty he goes off there, without any suggestion from me, and brings the card with perfect gravity. At the same time he is fond of a game, and if he is playful or excited will occasionally run about with any card. If through inadvertence he brings a card, for something he does not want, when the corresponding object is shown him, he seizes the card, takes it back again, and fetches the right one. No one who has seen him look...
Page 145 - I have elsewhere suggested that this arises very much from the fact that hitherto we have tried to teach animals, rather than to learn from them — to convey our ideas to them, rather than to devise any language or code of signals by means of which they might communicate theirs to us.

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