Practical Problems in Mathematics for Carpenters

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Cengage Learning, Aug 25, 2000 - Mathematics - 192 pages
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The Practical Problems in Mathematics series offers students of specific trades useful help in basic mathematics and opportunities to practice math principles on problems applied to their area of interest. Practical Problems in Mathematics for Carpenters, seventh edition, contains 43 instructional units progressing from the simplest basic arithmetic operations to compound problems applied in light frame construction. Each of the 43 units begins with a brief review of the math principal to be applied in that unit. The book contains more than 800 carpentry problems, including two comprehensive tests.
 

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Contents

Division of Whole Numbers
13
Multiplication of Common Fractions
29
Subtraction of Decimal Fractions
42
PERCENT AND PERCENTAGE
57
DIRECT AND COMPUTED
72
Square Measure
85
Surface MeasurementTriangles
88
The Framing Square
92
COMBINED OPERATIONS APPLIED TO BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
132
Rough Flooring
137
Wall Plates
139
Studding and FireStops or Draft Stops
142
Common Ratters
145
Hip Rafters
148
Sheathing
152
Trim
154

Surface MeasurementIrregular Figures
96
Unit25 Surface MeasurementCircles
101
Volume MeasurementCubes and Rectangular Solids
104
Board Measure
109
Unit28 Volume MeasurementCylinders
112
Weight Measure
116
SECTIONS POWERS AND ROOTS
121
Using Square Root to Find Sides of Right Triangles
124
Roofing
157
Doors and Windows
160
Siding
163
Stairs and Interior Door Jambs
166
GLOSSARY
169
APPENDIX
174
ANSWERS TO ODDNUMBERED PRACTICAL PROBLEMS
184
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Mark Huth is a former editor at Delmar Cengage Learning, a role that took him inside hundreds of classrooms and allowed him to glean the best teaching methods for his students and readers. He travels extensively throughout North America, gaining first-hand knowledge of construction methods and materials. In addition to BASIC PRINCIPLES FOR CONSTRUCTION, he is the author of several other respected texts on construction principles, technology, and mathematics. Mr. Huth has also taught high school building construction and worked as a professional carpenter and subcontractor. He holds a master of science degree in curriculum and instruction, as well as permanent certification in building construction from the New York State Education Department.

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