Practical Spoken Dialog Systems

Front Cover
Deborah Dahl
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 14, 2005 - Computers - 232 pages

Spoken dialog systems allow people to get information, conduct business, and be entertained, simply by speaking to a computer. There are hundreds of these systems currently in use, handling millions of interactions every day. How do they work? What problems do they solve? The goal of this book is to answer these questions and others like them, including:

How can I decide if a spoken dialog system is a good fit for the needs of my organization?

What’s the difference between a voice user interface and a conventional graphical interface? What are the psychological principles underlying voice user interfaces? What do I need to know about error handling in voice applications and accommodating both novice and experienced users?

How can I make use of newer technologies like speaker authentication?

What about development tools? How can I evaluate and select the right tools?

What can I expect when deploying a spoken dialog system? How is deploying a spoken dialog system different from deploying a web application? What details do I have to be aware of for the deployment to succeed?

What can we expect these systems to do in the future? What kinds of new capabilities are about to emerge from research laboratories?

For professional speech researchers, there is a rich technical literature covering many years of primary research in speech. However, this literature is not necessarily applicable to the needs of business people, application developers, and students who are interested in learning about the practical uses of speech technology. On the other hand, while existing introductory resources cover the basic mechanics of development of application development as well as aspects of the voice user interface, they don’t go far enough in dealing with the details that have to be taken into account to make spoken dialog systems successful in practice. What’s missing is information in between the in-depth technical literature and the more introductory development resources. The goal of this book is to provide information for anyone who wants to take the next step beyond the basics of current speech applications but isn’t yet ready to dive into the technical literature. It is hoped that this book will help project managers, application developers, and students gain a fuller and more complete understanding of spoken dialog technology and the practical aspects of developing and deploying spoken dialog applications.

 

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Contents

Beyond Technology
7
2 Speech Engagements
9
3 Discovery
13
4 Summary
22
Ten Principles for Designing HumanComputer Dialog Systems
24
2 Processing Speech
27
3 Producing Speech
33
4 Spoken Dialog Interaction
36
4 Grammar Design
114
5 Error Prompts
116
6 Complexity
117
7 Ambiguity
118
8 Miscellaneous
120
9 Conclusions
121
Designing for Speaker Authentication
123
2 Speaker Authentication Dialogs
126

5 Final Thoughts
38
Voice User Interface Design for Novice and Experienced Users
41
2 Developing Voice User Interfaces
47
4 Guidelines for Voice User Interfaces for Novice Users
52
5 Guidelines for User Interfaces for Experienced Users
54
6 Advanced Techniques
60
7 Iterative Testing
62
8 Summary
63
Designing Error Recovery Dialogs
65
2 Humanmachine Miscommunication
67
3 Kinds of Miscommunication
70
4 The Design of Error Recovery Subdialogs
74
5 How Users Signal Misunderstanding
81
Visualization Tools for Designing Spoken Dialogs
84
2 Visualizing Dialogs
86
3 The Role of Tools in Development
87
4 Example Dialog
88
5 General Issues and Selection criteria
102
6 Conclusion
103
7 Acknowledgments
104
How to Wreck a Nice Speech Grammar
105
2 Limitations of Speech Grammars
106
3 Who is the User?
108
3 Advanced Techniques
135
4 Handling Errors and Problems
137
5 Final Words
139
Using VoiceXML 20 in the VxOne Unified Messaging Application
141
1 Introduction
144
3 Generation of Dynamic VoiceXML pages
148
4 Speed and Latency
157
5 Prompt Generation
159
6 Conclusions
161
Building a Standards and Research Community with the Galaxy Communicator Software Infrastructure
165
2 Enabling an Engineering Community
168
3 The GALAXY Communicator software infrastructure
172
4 Design
176
5 Implementation and Logistics
189
6 Standards Commercialization and the GCSI
191
7 Conclusion
194
Building SpokenLanguage Collaborative Interface Agents
197
2 Collaborative Interface Agents
199
3 Four Spoken Language Collaborative Agents
205
4 Design Issues for Collaborative Agents
219
5 Related Work
224
INDEX
227
Copyright

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