Practical hints on elementary school work, by an experienced examiner [A.W. St. John].

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - ... disorder, dulness, or irregularity ; or that the teacher is satisfied with a low standard of duty. To schools of this class no merit grant should be awarded. But a school of humble aims, which passes only a moderately successful examination, may properly be designated
Page 37 - It is a class exercise, and may often be satisfactorily tested by requiring the teacher of the class to give a few questions in your presence, and by adding at discretion some questions of your own. The object of this exercise is to encourage dexterity, quickness, and accuracy in dealing with figures, and to anticipate, by means of rapid and varied oral practice with small numbers, the longer problems which have afterwards to be worked out in writing. It is obvious that this general object cannot...
Page 2 - It is the intention of their lordships that the mark "Excellent" should be reserved for cases of distinguished merit. A thoroughly good school in favourable conditions is characterised by cheerful and yet exact discipline, maintained without harshness and without noisy demonstration of authority. Its premises are cleanly and well-ordered ; its time-table provides a proper variety of mental employment and of physical exercise ; its...
Page 3 - Above all, its teaching and discipline are such as to exert a right influence on the manners, the conduct, and the character of the children...
Page 2 - Article 32 b. of the former Code, and in which a deduction of one or more tenths was made for " faults of instruction or discipline...
Page 2 - The Inspector will also satisfy himself that the teacher has neither withheld scholars improperly from examination nor unduly pressed those who are dull or delicate in preparation for it at any time of the year ; and that in classifying them for instruction, regard has been paid to their health, their age, and their mental capacity, as well as to their due progress in learning.
Page 51 - ... to you for approval on the day of inspection a list of the pieces chosen for the ensuing year. It is not necessary that the required number of lines should be taken from one poem ; they may be made up from two or more, provided that each extract learned by heart has a completeness and value of its own, and is understood in relation to the story or description of which it forms a part. The extracts should be simple enough to be pleasing and intelligible to children, yet, in Standards III. and...
Page 1 - To meet the requirements respecting discipline, the managers and teachers will be expected to satisfy the inspector that all reasonable care is taken, in the ordinary management of the school, to bring up the children in habits of punctuality, of good manners and language, of cleanliness and neatness, and also to impress upon the children the importance of cheerful obedience to duty, of consideration and respect for others, and of honour and truthfulness in word and act.
Page 49 - II. it will not be necessary for you to insist on the use of a reading book, if provision is made for meeting the requirements of the Code by a systematic course of collective lessons of which the heads are duly entered in the log-book. The best reading books for higher standards are those which are descriptive and explanatory, are well written, and suitably illustrated, and contain a sufficient amount and variety of interesting matter. When these conditions are fulfilled, and the reading lessons...

Bibliographic information