Practical Marine Engineering for Marine Engineers and Students: With Aids for Applicants for Marine Engineers' Licenses

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International marine engineering, 1911 - Marine engineering - 794 pages
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Contents

3 Globe Angle and Straightway Valves
240
Circulating Pumps
241
Condensers
243
Air Pumps
245
Feed Pumps and Injectors
251
Feed Heaters
255
Filters
260
Evaporators
261
Direct Acting Pumps
263
Blowers or Fans
267
Ash Ejectors
269
General Arrangement of Machinery
271
39 40 41 42 CHAPTER VI
273
3 Emergencies and Casualties
287
FngineRoom Routine and Management
298
1 Getting Under Way
299
2 Routine Operation
301
3 Minor Emergencies and Troubles
304
Boiler Corrosion
312
Boiler Scale 319
320
Boiler Overhauling and Repairs
328
2 Leakage from the Joints of Boiler Mountings
333
4l Leakage at Internal Joints
335
5 Patches
336
7 Blisters and Laminations
337
8 Tubes
338
9 Leakage About Stays and Braces
339
fill Split in FeedPipe
341
il Cylinders
342
2l Pin Joints and Bearings
343
3 Crosshead Guides
345
4 Crosshead Marks
346
Steam
444
Total Heat in a Substance
450
Latent Heat in Passing from Ice to Water
452
Steam Boiler Economy
453
Evaporation Per Pound of Coal
455
Evaporation Per Pound of Combustible
459
Steam Engine Economy
460
2 Relation of Expansion to Economy
469
3 Economy of the Actual Engine
471
Coal Consumption and Related Problems
472
The Lever Safety Valve and the Safety Valve Problem
476
The Boiler Brace Problem
480
Strength of Boilers
485
Loss by Blow Off
489
Gain by Feed Water Heating
491
The Proportions of Cylinders for Multiple Expansion Engines
492
Clearance and Its Determination
494
The Effect of Clearance in Modifying the Apparent Expansion Ratio as Given by the Point of CutOff
496
Engine Constant
497
Indicated Thrust
498
Reduced Mean Effective Pressure
500
Pressure on Main Guides
502
Force Required to Move a Slide Valve 53
503
Amount of Condensing Water Required
504
Work Done by Pumps
505
Discharge of Steam Through an Orifice
507
Computing Weights of Parts of Machinery
508
2 Approximations and Short Cuts
509
CHAPTER X
514
Screw Propeller
518
1 Definitions 5r7 2 Varieties of Propellers
523
Refrigeration by Vaporization and Expansion
547
Principal Features of Ammonia Refrigerating Apparatus
549
Refrigeration by the Expansion of a Compressed Gas
553
qi Principal Features of Compressed Air Refrigerating Apparatus
554
Part II
583
Decimal Fractions
592
SECTION PAGE 2 Compound Proportion
610
Evolution and Involution
612
2 To Extract the Square Root
613
3 To Extract the Cube Root
615
Mathematical Signs Symbols and Operations
616
Geometry and Mensuration
621
1 Square 021
622
4 Trapezoid
623
5 Triangle
624
7 Trapezium
625
9 Irregular Figures 026
626
11 Circular Ring or Annulus
628
h Segment of Circle
629
14 Ellipse
630
16 Prism
633
17 Cylinder
634
18 Any Solid with a Constant Section Parallel to the Base Either Right or Oblique
635
20 Right Pyramid
636
22 Right Circular Cone
637
24 Frustum of Right Pyramid
638
25I Frustum of General Pyramid
639
27I Frustum of General Cone
640
30 Volume Generated by Any Area Revolving About an Axis
641
Problems in Geometry
642
2I To Bisect the Distance Between Two Points
643
6 To Bisect a Given Arc or Angle
644
9 To Construct a Square Equivalent in Area to a Given Rectangle
645
13 To Construct an Ellipse
646
14 To Construct any Regular Polvgon
647
15 To Develop the Surface of a Cylinder
648
18 To Develop the Surface of the Frustum of a Cone
649
Physics
650
3 Heat Unit
651
Mechanics
652
4 Moment of a Force
653
8 Energy
655
9 Conservation of Energy
656
13 Mechanical Powers
659
14 Examples in Mechanics
665
Part III
670
CHAPTER I
671
Principles of Action
672
Definitions
674
Velocity Diagrams and Work by Steam
678
The Turbine for Ship Propulsion
681
2 Superheat
682
Parsons Turbines
683
2 Construction of Turbines
686
3 The Cylinder
687
4 The Rotor
689
5 Other details
690
6 Blading
691
7 Action of the Steam
692
Curtis Turbine
694
2 Construction of Turbine
696
s The Nozzle 608
698
Operation and Care of Refrigerating Machinery 556
782

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 606 - In the multiplication of whole numbers, place the multiplier under the multiplicand, and multiply each term of the multiplicand by each term of the multiplier, writing the right-hand figure of each product obtained under the term of the multiplier which produces it.
Page 640 - A sphere is a solid bounded by a curved surface, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 29 - ... with the name of the manufacturer, the place where manufactured, and the number of pounds tensile strain it will bear to the sectional square inch...
Page 626 - A Circle is a plane figure bounded by a curved line every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 613 - Separate the given number into periods of two figures each, beginning at the right hand: the period on the left will often contain but one figure.
Page 146 - All heads employed in the construction of cylindrical externally fired boilers for steamers navigating the Red River of the North and rivers whose waters flow into the Gulf of Mexico shall have a thickness of material as follows: (1) Over 32 inches and not over 36 inches, not less than '/2 inch.
Page 607 - The ratio between two numbers is simply their numerical relationship expressed as the quotient of the first divided by the second. Thus the ratio of 6 to 3 is 2 ; of 1.2 to 3 is .4; of 4 to 5 is .8, etc.
Page iii - THE design of the author, in the preparation of this work, has been to afford to the student of physiology the utmost facility in the pursuit of that branch of his medical education.
Page 417 - MEP in pounds per square inch; A = area of piston in square inches; L = length of stroke in feet ; N= number of working strokes per minute.
Page 590 - X %= % Hence for the division of one fraction by another the usual rule again results, as follows: Rule. — Invert the terms of the divisor and proceed as in multiplication. This might naturally be expected by remembering the relation between multiplication and division, and that one is the exact inverse of the other. For the multiplication of a series of fractions into each other these principles work out as follows : ',6 X % X % X % means that % is first considered as a subject and % as an operator.

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