Pragmatics

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 9, 1983 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 420 pages
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Those aspects of language use that are crucial to an understanding of language as a system, and especially to an understanding of meaning, are the acknowledged concern of linguistic pragmatics. This textbook provides a lucid and integrative analysis of the central topics in pragmatics - deixis, implicature, presupposition, speech acts, and conversational structure. A central concern of the book is the relation between pragmatics and semantics, and Dr Levinson shows clearly how a pragmatic approach can resolve some of the problems semantics have been confronting and simplifying semantic analyses. The exposition is always clear and supported by helpful exemplification. The detailed analyses of selected topics give the student a clear view of the empirical rigour demanded by the study of linguistic pragmatics, but Dr Levinson never loses sight of the rich diversity of the subject. An introduction and conclusion relate pragmatics to other fields in linguistics and other disciplines concerned with language usage - psychology, philosophy, anthropology and literature.
 

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Contents

The scope of pragmatics
1
12 Defining pragmatics
5
13 Current interest in pragmatics
35
an example
47
Deixis
54
21 Philosophical approaches
55
22 Descriptive approaches
61
221 Person deixis
68
speech acts are irreducible to matters of truth and falsity
243
the reduction of illocutionary force to ordinary syntax and semantics
246
54 Collapse of Antithesis
251
542 Syntactic problems
260
a problem for Thesis and Antithesis
263
56 The contextchange theory of speech acts
276
57 Beyond theories of speech acts
278
Conversational structure
284

222 Time deixis
73
223 Place deixis
79
224 Discourse deixis
85
225 Social deixis
89
23 Conclusions
94
Conversational implicature
97
31 Grices theory of implicature
100
32 Revisions problems and applications
118
322 Implicature and logical form
122
323 Kinds of implicature
126
324 Generalized Quantity implicatures
132
a case of maxim exploitation
147
326 Implicature and language structure
162
Presupposition
167
41 Historical background
169
initial observations
177
43 The problematic properties
185
431 Defeasibility
186
432 The projection problem
191
44 Kinds of explanation
199
442 Pragmatic theories of presupposition
204
45 Conclusions
225
Speech acts
226
51 Philosophical background
227
61 Discourse analysis versus conversation analysis
286
62 Conversation analysis
294
621 Some basic findings
296
6212 Adjacency pairs
303
6213 Overall organization
308
622 Some remarks on methodology
318
623 Some applications
326
63 Preference organization
332
632 Preferred sequences
339
64 Presequences
345
642 Preannouncements
349
a reanalysis of indirect speech acts
356
65 Conclusions
364
652 Some rema1ning questions
367
transcription conventions
369
Conclusions
371
71 Pragmatics and core linguistics
372
72 Pragmatics sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics
374
pragmatics and other fields
376
Bibliography
379
Subject index
397
Index of names
417
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About the author (1983)

Stephen C. Levinson is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Professor of Comparative Linguistics at the University of Nijmegen. His publications include Pragmatics (Cambridge, 1983), Politeness (co-author Cambridge, 1987), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity (co-editor, Cambridge, 1996), Language Acquisition and Conceptual Development (co-editor, Cambridge, 2001) and Presumptive Meaning (2001).

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