Prairie Home Breads: 150 Splendid Recipes from America's Breadbasket

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct 11, 2011 - Cooking - 256 pages
Prairie Home Breads proves that not only is the Midwest where America's grains are grown, but it's also where the art of bread baking is taken seriously.To create these 150 recipes, Judith M. Fertig visited artisanal bakeries, working farmhouse kitchens, rural church suppers, urban bakeries, farmer's markets, and typical home kitchens. She found yeast breads as varied as Amish Pinwheel Bread and Roasted Sweet Pepper Bread, as well as naturally leavened breads like Brewhouse Bread and whole grain breads like Northern Prairie Barley Bread. There are also buns and rolls, as well as quick biscuits, popovers, and crackers. Along with elegant tea breads and homey muffins there are scrumptious coffeecakes, kuchens, and strudels. Last but not least, there are recipes for accompaniments and for using up leftovers.Prairie Home Breads is also filled with rich stories of ethnic and regional culture, agriculture, Midwestern culinary traditions, and warm celebrations of Heartland food.
 

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User Review  - beau.p.laurence - LibraryThing

Solid book with good cross-section of recipes from easy & classic to those needing a levain or a sponge. Very homey feel to the natural paper and illustrations (no photos). Read full review

Prairie Home Breads: 150 Splendid Recipes from America's Breadbasket

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A cooking columnist and author of three cookbooks, including the James Beard Cookbook Award and IACP Cookbook Award nominee Prairie Home Cooking (LJ 8/99), Fertig returns to the Midwest to explore its ... Read full review

Contents

Yeast Breads
1
Naturally Leavened and SlowRising Breads
39
WholeGrain Breads
81
Rolls and Buns
113
Quick Breads Muffins Popovers
139
Scones Biscuits Crackers and a Soda Bread
157
Coffee Cakes and Pastries
179
Resources
213
Index
221
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About the author (2011)

Judith M. Fertig is a bestselling and award-winning cookbook author. She lives in Shawnee Mission, Kansas, where she develops recipes that celebrate the rich culinary traditions of the Heartland. A recognized authority on regional Midwestern cuisine and an experienced cookbook author and food writer, she has studied at the Cordon Bleu in London and La Varenne in Paris. Prairie Home Breads follows Fertig's definitive Prairie Home Cooking, a collection of recipes inspired by the abundant produce of the Midwestern states, including wild and heirloom fruits and vegetables, game, grains, and beef. The bestselling Prairie Home Cooking was a 1999 nominee for both the IACP Cookbook Award and the James Beard Book Award. Fertig is also the author of the award-winning Pure Prairie: Farm Fresh and Wildly Delicious Foods from the Prairie, as well as several books on barbeque with coauthor Karen Adler. In addition to these cookbooks, Fertig wrote the Great Plains chapter of the American version of Culinaria, a two-volume book on American culinary traditions. She is a contributor to numerous distinguished magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times, the London Sunday Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, Saveur, Sante, Country Living, and Country Home. Fertig was inspired to write the Prairie Home cookbooks while living in London. Although she had lived and traveled all over the Midwest, living abroad gave her a new perspective, revealing the Midwest as a region of culinary innovation, cultural diversity, and fresh and varied native foods and produce. Looking at this familiar region from a new perspective allowed Fertig to capture the honest wholesomeness of Midwestern cuisine in her cookbooks. To write Prairie Home Breads, Fertig visited Old World artisanal bakeries, farmhouse kitchens, rural church suppers, community bake sales, bustling urban ethnic bakeries, farmer's markets, and home kitchens throughout the Midwest. Fertig shares her considerable culinary expertise and her appreciation of the Midwestern kitchen in cooking classes and seminars and as a restaurant consultant.

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